Tutorials/Tips and tricks



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Here are some little hints for those who are new or would like to learn more tips and tricks about Minecraft. Tips may also be found under the “Trivia” section of some pages, and those are likely to be more in-depth.

Controls[]

Controls can be fully customized in nearly all versions of Minecraft. By opening settings and navigating to the Controls option, the player can change their key mappings to whatever they wish. In the Bedrock Edition, a touchscreen, keyboard and mouse, a controller, or just a keyboard may be used to control the game. However, Java Edition only supports keyboard and mouse control. Some additional control related options, such as auto jump, and sprint/sneaking toggle/hold settings can be changed.

Finding directions[]

Within the Minecraft world, a compass is not how you tell which way is north! Rather, it always points to a fixed point, the “world spawn”. However, it can be useful to know which way north is. There are a few ways:

  • North can be found by hitting a block and checking the directions of the cracks which occur on a block as it is mined.
    • This may not work if a resource pack that changes the crack pattern is being used.
    • First, learn the crack pattern. If a block is hit on its side, there should be one crack going almost straight up, one to the right, and one going almost straight down.
    • If a block on the ground is hit, the same crack pattern will appear. The crack which went almost straight up on the side of the block, will point north on the top of a block.
  • You can watch which direction the sun, moon, stars, or clouds are moving. Each of these always moves from east to west.
  • In the Java Edition, the debug screen (activated by pressing F3) gives information on which way the player is facing.
  • If you have a map (In Bedrock Edition, a locator map) covering where you are, the map will show an arrow-like player icon. This points the same way that you are facing in the world. The top of the map is north, the right edge is east, and so on.

Changing the rules[]

Peaceful mode[]

If you are having too much difficulty with hostile mobs, such as a zombie or a creeper, or can’t find any food to eat, you may be able to set the world difficulty to peaceful. When you change to peaceful mode, hunger and health will quickly regenerate, the hunger bar will never decrease, and all hostile mobs will instantly despawn.

However, this is a controversial move — in a pure survival game, many players will consider it to be cheating, which takes away much of what they see as the challenge and fun of Minecraft, especially when used as a “panic button”. That said, it’s better than a ragequit, and Minecraft is meant to accommodate many different styles of play.

When the “point” of your own game is more about construction or artistic builds than about surviving the monsters, peaceful mode becomes very helpful. It can also be used as a “training” mode to learn the game controls and get used to the Minecraft world.

Single-player worlds have an option to lock world difficulties and eliminate this option, keeping you “honest” in the gameplay; for multi-player worlds, you will not be allowed to change the world’s difficulty unless you are the world owner (or at least an “op”).

Game rules[]

Another option for moderating the game difficulty is to alter the game rules with “cheat commands”, or by choosing them when creating the world. As with peaceful mode, these are controversial, but in single-player… well, it’s your game. On a multi-player server, you probably will not be able to change these rules in any case, unless you are the server owner. See the linked page for full details.

  • The most powerful rule in this respect is probablykeepInventory. Once set to true, players who die will respawn with their items and experience intact, instead of dropping their equipment where they died. If you have a lot of valuable items like diamond armor, a diamond sword, diamonds, gold, and iron, then you will be more afraid to have all your hard work come to nothing. Unfortunately, this means that if you dug a hole into lava, all of the items that you were carrying will be lost forever. Therefore, altering this rule is quite useful.
  • Another, less controversial, rule, is mobGriefing. This will prevent all mobs from breaking blocks, picking up items, or trampling your crops. Most obviously, this prevents creepers and Endermen from damaging your builds; it will also prevent mobs from picking up your items after your death. As a non-obvious side effect, it will prevent villagers from breeding, because they need to collect food to do so. It will also have significant effects in the Nether (Ghasts, Blazes, Piglins) and will drastically affect the late-game Wither fight, and the Ender Dragon battle.

Open the world to LAN[]

Sometimes you’re desperate to cheat, so as to prevent what you all done come into nothing. More specifically, you may want to change the game rule after the world was created, but you may find you did not allow cheating when creating the world.

There is an “Open to LAN” option, which allows you to enable cheats, even if you did not toggle “Allow Cheating” when creating the world. When cheats are enabled, you can go into creative mode and replace lost items, as well as set /gamerule keepInventory to true. However, note that this is cheating. Many players believe that it’s better to think about their mistakes and start over.

Be careful if you open the world to LAN because if you click “esc”, mobs, blocks, and other in-game things can still move, even when you’re paused. That means if you’re chasing a cow while in LAN and clicked “esc” to pause, the cow can still run or move.

However, if you are playing multiplayer and you are not the server owner, you cannot just enable cheats. In that case, you could ask the one that hosts the Multiplayer game to replace the items or create a new world in singleplayer.

Crafting tips[]

Recent versions of Minecraft feature a recipe book, which will supply most of the recipes that can be made with all items you’ve ever picked up. It can also make it easier to craft as well as remember recipes. That said, it is possible to craft recipes that aren’t in the book yet, by remembering their crafting pattern. (They will then be added to the book, along with many recipes using the new item.)

For several common wooden tools, there are routines to quickly craft them with an even number of logs, dragging the planks or sticks into place and using shift-click to craft multiple recipes.

  • For fences, you will want a multiple of 5 logs. Convert them to planks, then convert one-fifth (1/5) of the total to sticks. With 20 logs, you can just turn the smaller stack of 16 planks into sticks, then craft that with the other stack of 64 planks, for 48 fences.
  • By comparison, fence gates are easy, and cost exactly 1 log each. Convert the logs to planks, then convert half of the planks to sticks.
  • For ladders, crafting 7 logs at a time into sticks will let you just drag the resulting pile into the ladder shape, for 24 ladders.
    • If you have a lot of spare sticks, a stack of them will make 27 ladders with one leftover.
  • For slabs, doors, or trapdoors, multiples of 3 will come out even, (Likewise for stone slabs and walls.)
  • Chests cost 2 logs each. Crafting 16 logs will get you a stack of 64 planks, which you can drag into the box shape to make 8 chests at a time.

When working with the many kinds of stone, a stonecutter is very useful. Not only does it let you make various decorative blocks individually (without needing to craft 3 or 4 blocks at a time), but it makes stone stairs cheaper: The stonecutter can make 1 stair per block, while the crafting table needs 6 blocks to make only 4 stairs.

Later, you will get hold of netherrack, and one of the important things to make from it is nether brick fences. The recipe is a little complex, but can likewise be made in bulk: Smelt your netherrack into nether brick items, and take 180 bricks at a time (3 stacks minus 12). Drag these across the crafting table to split them into 9 stacks. Set aside one of the stacks, and combine the other stacks pairwise into the 2×2 nether brick block recipe. That gives you the blocks and set-aside bricks for 60 fences. Even if you don’t bother setting aside the 12 bricks, this will still work, you’ll just be crafting a couple of extra nether brick blocks in the process.

Name Ingredients Crafting recipe
Nether Bricks Nether Brick
Nether Brick Fence Nether Bricks +
Nether Brick

If you are struggling to remember crafting patterns, try taking a closer look at a pattern, like the fishing rod pattern. Take notice of how the sticks and string line up to look like a fishing rod. Many patterns follow this trait, such as doors, which use two columns of wood planks to make the rectangular shape of a door, and swords, which use two wooden planks, cobblestone, iron ingots, gold ingots, or diamonds for the blade and a stick for the handle.

In single-player, you can also pause the game and visit the wiki for that item for the recipe.

You can also save a bit of time by stacking some items to make two or more different items in a pass. The examples below show how to stack items to craft two or three items in quick succession.

Name Ingredients Crafting recipe
Stone Pickaxe or
Stone Shovel
Cobblestone +
Stick

222

Leather Pants or
Leather Cap
Leather
Golden Chestplate or
Golden Helmet or
Golden Boots
Gold Ingot
Minecart or
Bucket
Iron Ingot

222

Smelting[]

For smelting, it hardly matters what’s being smelted, as long as the furnace type is appropriate.

  • Setting up an “auto-smelter” or few with hoppers to feed in items and remove output makes life much more convenient.
  • A single furnace smelting a stack of items will take 10 minutes 40 seconds, or more than half a Minecraft day.
  • Using a blast furnace or smoker for appropriate jobs will take half the time: 5 minutes 20 seconds for a stack.
  • Splitting up jobs into multiple batches to use two or more furnaces (perhaps of different types) can save a lot of time.
  • While a few items worth of wasted fuel hardly matters in the long run, it’s worth knowing a few numbers that will come out even:
    • 8 pieces of coal or charcoal smelts a stack of items, a stack of coal smelts 8 stacks.
    • 16 dried kelp blocks smelts 5 stacks of items, a stack of the blocks will smelt 20 stacks.
    • 16 blaze rods smelts 3 stacks, a stack of rods smelts 12 stacks.
    • 4 blocks of coal smelts 5 stacks.
    • A stack of 16 buckets, filled with lava (they will no longer stack) smelts 25 stacks, which is just two stacks short of a full chest. (And one of those empty slots will receive the emptied buckets.)
    • Most wooden “leftovers” will match planks: 2 stacks smelt 3 stacks of items. The others will mostly match either sticks (4 stacks smelt 3 stacks), or wooden tools and weapons (1 smelts 1).
    • In Bedrock Edition, slabs burn as long as planks, so you can double your burning time by converting planks to slabs. This even beats turning the logs into charcoal.
  • For really big jobs: Smelting a full chest of stackable items (1,728 items) in a single furnace will take most of 5 hours real time, or almost 2½ hours in a smoker or blast furnace. The fuel required is one of:
    • 18 lava buckets (with over a stack’s worth of time left over)
    • 22 coal blocks, or 216 pieces (3 stacks+24 pieces). The blocks save 18 pieces of coal, and the leftover time can smelt another half-stack (4 pieces’ worth).
    • 87 (1 stack+23) dried kelp blocks
    • 144 (2 stacks+16) blaze rods

Light and darkness[]

Light is a key resource in the game: Besides letting you see effectively, it prevents most monsters from spawning, which effectively makes it the usual way to “claim” territory as player-controlled. Initially you will be getting most of your light from daylight and torches Torches have a base light level of 14 — later you will be getting a number of other light sources, which are slightly brighter, at light level 15 (which is the maximum possible). The key point is that the light level from any of these drops by 1 for each block in any direction: east, west, north, south, up, and down. Diagonals count as two steps! Overworld monsters will only spawn in complete darkness, or in pre-1.18 versions, light level 7 or less.

If you’re short on torches, you can use the above to save some torches in the shelter: even if things are a little dim, any space within 13 blocks of a torch (again, up and down count) is spawn proof. Also, monsters won’t randomly spawn near the player (24 blocks): The player may want to light up a perimeter just to see what’s coming and light the base so the player does not need to come back to find a new tenant, but monsters won’t be appearing in front of them. Mobs also need a “full block” to spawn: They won’t spawn in midair, or on top of fences, buttons, or other partial blocks. You can make the floor in your base out of slabs, this helps you both save bricks and prevent mob spawning. Land monsters also won’t spawn in water, but drowned can. (Exception: Near a dungeon spawner, they can indeed spawn in midair.)

If you use the F3 debug screen, you can see the light level of the block you are standing on — pacing around your base with the debug screen on, can help you find potential trouble spots. However, rather than skimping on torches, it’s best to take the trouble to get hold of lots of coal to make all the torches you need.

In order to save torches while mining, they can be placed along the floor every 26 blocks, since a torch has a light level of 14, and that spacing will ensure the light level never drops to 0, where mobs will be able to spawn. If F3 is enabled, place the torch when the light level of the block the player is standing on is 2.

If you have shelter, wood, and cobblestone, but cannot find any coal to fuel or light the environment, just make a furnace, and smelt some logs (not planks). Use the planks for fuel—2 planks for every three logs the player wants to smelt. This will smelt into charcoal, which is almost identical to coal, except that it cannot be packed into coal blocks (or sold to villagers). Trees are pretty easy to grow, and especially once you can grow spruce or jungle “giant” trees, or even dark oaks, wood will be plentiful enough to make a lot of charcoal. That said, coal itself is pretty common too, and can even be found wherever stone shows at the surface.!

Trying to see ores in dark places is very hard for the eyes, and you might encounter vision problems. To avoid that, change the brightness by going into Settings > Video Settings then look for the slider named “Brightness”. By default, the game has a “Moody” brightness setting. Set it up to a higher level (“Bright” is recommended). This will save the player’s vision because you don’t have to squint too much to see things. However, it won’t let you see much in real darkness, and it won’t affect monster spawning. This trick is especially useful in the Nether, where everything is somewhat lit without torches on a “bright” setting, and some mobs spawn at any light level.

Beds and bases[]

Building a house[]

There are some recommendations for early building:

For beginners, the player might want to hollow out the side of a hill or mountain. This can be done quickly and turn into a good shelter, but keep in mind it will be harder to find the home if the player wanders off, or the player could place torches if they have any around the entrance. Good thing is that the mobs can’t track any players down by light sources, except zombies. A second design is to collect a lot of logs and build a house of planks. These stand out easily, look good, and function well. The bad thing is they and their slab counterparts are flammable and may be set on fire by lightning.

A more durable shelter can be made of cobblestone, stone (including andesite, diorite or granite), or stone bricks, but don’t use dirt for anything but strictly temporary shelters (dirt is easily demolished by creepers). Don’t build with or on sand or gravel, since they are affected by gravity, which will make things very difficult when a player decides to expand the shelter or dig a basement. The most durable block to make a house with is obsidian, which can’t be blown up even by TNT, much less creepers. However, using obsidian makes it hard to remodel, you can’t make slabs or stairs out of it, and you might want your base to have other colors besides black.

These are some recommendations for later building:

Take the time to make a dedicated storage area with a good amount of chests. Reorganizing every 30 minutes is a pain.

Make some farms that are modular and therefore can be easily expanded.

If the shelter was made out of wood at first, then players may want to change it to something more blast-resistant, like Cobblestone, or even obsidian, if supplies allow. However, resistance isn’t always a top priority, and you may just want to build a nice house, if that is the case, then just be wary of any nearby mobs, try to spawn proof the area to the best of your ability, and possibly put a border around your house with a fence.

Set your spawn[]

If your base is far away from the spawn point, and if you have 3 wool and 3 planks, you can make a bed. Clicking on the bed will set your spawn point to the bed, and as of version 1.15 this will work even during the daytime (actually sleeping in the bed will also set your spawn point). However, if the bed is not there (or blocked) when you do die, the spawn point will be lost entirely and you will respawn near the world spawn point. When moving your spawn point within the base, make sure to set your spawn point to the new bed immediately.

Be careful when decorating around the bed. Some block placements will allow you to sleep in the bed, but will prevent the bed from actually letting you respawn. Never completely surround the bed, even with half-height blocks, such as stone slabs. Also, if you put glass beside your bed, you may not be able to spawn beside it, as players cannot naturally spawn on glass. If your bed is obstructed and you died somewhere, you will end up near the world spawn point with a message saying that “Your bed is missing or obstructed”. A good way to check if your bed is not obstructed is to build a copy of your bed and the blocks surrounding it near world spawn, and then jump on a Pointed Dripstone until you die. If all is well, you should respawn on or next to your bed, but if you ended up at world spawn, you can easily get your stuff back and edit the bed until you respawn by your bed.

Also, you need to be able to stand on the bed if you want to set a new spawn point, meaning that the spawn point won’t be reset if you sleep in a bed with a block above it.[verify]

Field Bases[]

If you have discovered a structure that could yield you many items, such as a mineshaft, a stronghold, or a swamp hut, you may be tempted by the riches. However, don’t attempt to enter right away, as you may lose any valuables and may not be able to reach them in time. To prevent this from happening, set up a new spawn point at the outskirts of the discovered structure by placing a bed and sleeping in it. Carry a bed at all times when exploring far away from home. This will also let you skip past dangerous nights and storms, rather than fighting or hiding for the duration.

Consider that when you die, you will respawn without your items. If you died someplace deep underground, you are likely to have monsters between you and the dropped items. If you plan to create a spawn base nearby, that base needs to have enough resources for you to be properly equipped before charging back into the fray. The basic kit for a spawn base should be at least half a stack of iron (or the equipment it makes, sees below), at least half a stack of planks and a quarter-stack of coal, plus bow and arrows, and food. Supplies of other equipment (torches, fences, ladders, etc.) are also helpful. Another technique is to use ender chests. This way, you can access resources from your main base. However, for this to work, you need to have another one in your main base, and also remember to stock it with items. This technique is better for more advanced players who have the necessary resources.

If there is not enough to spare to stock the base, then you may be better off respawning at your distant base, well out of chunk loading range from the death. Your items will not disappear in unloaded chunks, so if you want to easily regain your items, move to a few hundred blocks from the death site, and then zip back there as fast as possible before the five-minute timer runs out. As preparation for this, you can mark out your route from the surface to the mine, especially the proper entrances.

If you decide on a nearby spawn base, the first priority is safety—pick an area that is well lit and closed off from dangerous areas, and specially protected from creepers (stone/cobblestone walls, a door, and glassed or fenced windows to view the area in front of the entrance). A small room will do, but there needs to be enough space for a crafting table, a furnace, and at least one double-chest to store supplies (these can be embedded in the floor if needed.) Of course, you also need space for the bed, and free space next to the head of the bed to respawn. There should also be room for an infinite water source, which can be tucked half under a wall.

What you need for the base will be a bed, crafting table, furnace, and a chest. If there is no wool for the bed, you can use string (plentiful in mineshafts) to make some. The chest should contain at minimum a full set of iron armor, iron sword, a bucket, and either a second bucket, an iron pick, or shears and a flint-and-steel. (By an amazing coincidence, this is exactly what can be made with half a stack of iron ingots.) You should also have a stone pick, shovel, and axe, a bow and at least half a stack of arrows, preferably a full-stack. Pre-craft some tools: Another chest, and at least half a stack of torches. Some fences, gates, and ladders, a door, or whatever, may come in handy too. You will need a fair bit of food, at least a quarter-stack of steak or porkchops or more of lesser foods. Just to be careful, stick some spare blocks in there too—a half-stack to a stack apiece of cobblestone, dirt, and gravel, as well as extra wood. (Sand is less useful, but some glass might come in handy.) Having some extra raw materials handy: coal, string, redstone, etc., is always good. If possible, top off the selection with a spare copy of the map, and a clock—these can be in frames if desired.

Before delving into the depths, remember to use that bed to set your spawn point (watch for the message). Just placing it is not enough, remember to sleep in the bed to reset the spawn point there. Now when you die, you will reappear not helpless in the midst of a dangerous cavern, but in a secure base with a full set of supplies to go back and seek revenge since most players want to kill the mob that killed them, or at least the items. Note that creeper attacks and other liabilities are not covered.

Zombie-proof door[]

Zombies can break down doors, if the game difficulty is set to hard when night falls. Here’s a solution that doesn’t require the player to craft an iron door or compromise the base’s security. Simply break down the door, then turn so that the player is perpendicular to where the door just was, and place the door. Get out of the hole the door is occupying, and open it by right-clicking. Now, if the door is placed it the right way, zombies will think that the door is open and avoid it. One can also place any regular block such as dirt or cobblestone in front of the door to prevent zombies from getting to it. If the block is placed on the outside side of the door, the zombie will not be able to damage the door. If the block is placed on the inside side of the door, the zombie can break down the door, but cannot proceed further inside.

One can also place sand or gravel above the door, that way, if the zombie does break the door, it will fall and close the entrance off; or can make a water or lava ditch after the door, also preventing zombies and other mobs from entering. Make sure that the house is not a flammable substance, or that anything is around the ditch.

The simplest solution is to use a fence gate instead of a door, as zombies do not recognize them as doors. One must, however, guard against creepers, which will treat fence gates as fences as per priming-time detection range mechanics (creepers will start the countdown even if blocked by fences, as they are in the same space as the fence). The laziest way to protect against undead intruders is to dig a 1×3 trench in front of the door—to break down doors, zombies must destroy the top half of the door. If zombies are on the door trench, they must jump to attempt to break the top half of the door, which resets the zombie door breaking mechanic. Note that this method only works if the door was installed flush to the outside wall of the dwelling. Also, putting a block underneath the door forces the zombies to jump, break, fall, fail, repeat, exact same mechanic, simply make a 3 high doorway and instead of a door and another block on top, put a block on the bottom and door on the top two block spaces, allowing villagers to still use these doors.

Another way is to build a door frame around the door. Then, add a trapdoor to the middle blocks. Zombies will not be able to break down the door.

Simple trapdoor/fence wall[]

If you read about trapdoors and fences, you will know that mobs cannot jump over open trapdoors and no player or mob can pass over fences without the jump boost effect. You can completely surround your base with trapdoors or fences and open the trapdoors if you do not want to place fence gates. Note that flying mobs, such as withers, ghasts, or phantoms, can still enter your base territory.

Legitimate Motion Sensor[]

To detect mobs in their tracks, simply surround the house with a ton of planks. The mobs should walk on the planks and make plank sounds, therefore alerting the player of their presence. Then the player can dig down or prepare for battle. The preferable radius is 5 blocks out.

Note: The volume must be somewhat high for this to be effective.

Adding pressure plates with note blocks underneath it can increase the loudness and allow the player to detect invisible mobs/players by seeing which pressure plates are pressed down, or you can simply add redstone wires and note blocks that connect to the pressure plates to make more sounds.

Minecart perimeter[]

A trick to defend the base that works best once the player is settled in, and have enough iron to make at least tracks, and ideally powered rails and a minecart. The simple version is to just ring the house with rails — mobs will not walk across tracks. However, this will not prevent creepers exploding, skeletons shooting across the rails, or endermen teleporting into your base.

If you have enough gold and some redstone for powered rails, you can craft those plus a few minecarts, and set the carts spinning around the perimeter. Any mobs that come close enough to the tracks will be scooped up by the minecart and taken for a ride. This trap can be modified with one-block-high tunnels to suffocate any mobs in the cart. The player can also ride the carts by the player – they will travel fast enough that most mobs can’t attack him or her. This, however, takes much more skill to use, and can still trigger creeper explosions.

Emergency Shelters[]

If you are stuck outside in the middle of the night with many hostile mobs coming to attack you, you can make an emergency shelter. Ideally, you should dig three blocks down and place a block above you, making a cramped yet safe area to stay in. You should have a torch however; if you wish to avoid being in the dark without a light source. If the monsters aren’t already too close, you can even dig out more space to place a bed. You can get out of the hole by pillar jumping if you do not have any ladders. This method is not terribly though, as you are completely exposed to mobs as you leave.

Pillar jumping, instead of digging down is another solution. You simply make a pillar directly under yourself; 10 or 12 blocks will put you out of reach of arrows from skeletons, and out of range from monsters in general, except phantoms. To hold off spiders, however, you will have to build an overhang around the top block of the pillar. Pillar jumping rather than digging down also removes the possibility of digging into a pit of lava or a cave, although it is rare for one of these to generate 3 blocks from the surface. Note that this will backfire horribly if you have not slept in a bed for a few days, as phantoms will easily swarm you and knock you off your pillar. These can be avoided by building out a mini-shelter atop your pillar, just enough that you have a ceiling to stand under.

As a last resort, you can simply set the difficulty to peaceful mode, getting rid of all the mobs. (See Peaceful mode.)

Mining[]

As you can tell from the name of this game, mining is pretty important. Mining is more general than it sounds, including almost any situation where you collect or harvest resources by simply breaking the blocks they consist of. Those blocks fall into four general categories according to their tool: Wood, mined with an axe, dirt-type blocks mined with a shovel, the classic stone-type blocks (including ores) which are mined with a pickaxe, and “other” blocks, which are mined with “bare hands” or, more quickly, with a hoe. Swords can be used to break cobwebs and bamboo.

For most of these, you technically can collect them with bare hands, it will just be slow, sometimes very slow. Mining with any item besides one of these tools, counts as “bare hands”, and so does mining wood, stone, or dirt type blocks with a hoe. However, stone-type blocks in general absolutely require a pickaxe to get the actual block or mineral that you’re looking for, and the pickaxe must also be of sufficient “tier” for the ore (or mineral block) in question. Common stone and rocks, and coal ore, can be mined with any pickaxe; copper, iron, and lapis lazuli require at least a stone pickaxe; gold, redstone, amethyst and diamond require at least iron, and obsidian or ancient debris/netherite require a diamond pickaxe. If you try to mine any of these without a pickaxe, or with a pickaxe that isn’t strong enough, you will eventually break through the block, but it will drop nothing. This can be useful if you have no tools or wood to make more, and just need to get through some stone, but it doesn’t let you collect resources. For normal business, you will want to always be carrying at least one each of pickaxe, axe, and shovel, to quickly deal with blocks of their type.

All these tools have “durability”, meaning that they can only mine a limited number of blocks. When they run out completely, the tool will break, leaving you bare-handed. The decreasing durability is shown by a little colored bar under the tool (no bar means that the tool is unused, with full durability). In desktop editions of Minecraft, pressing F3 + H will change the display mode so that their tooltips show the numeric value of the durability. As the game progresses, you will be able to enchant tools to extend their durability and even let them repair themselves as you gain experience.

Until then, you will need to make new tools as the old ones wear out. You can also use a crafting grid to combine two mostly-worn-out tools of the same type and tier — this combines their durability, with a small bonus for good measure. (Don’t do this with enchanted tools!) When going out to mine, check the durability of your tools before leaving, to make sure you don’t unexpectedly get caught without a tool. You can also bring along spare tools or materials (stone or iron, plus wood) to make new tools: You will need a crafting table, but you can make one on the spot from a single log of wood. Stone tools are cheap, and for the early game you should be using mostly those, saving your iron pickaxe for the ores that need it. Once you have plenty of iron, you can start using iron tools for “everyday” mining — they are faster and last longer — while saving your diamond and/or enchanted tools. Diamond tools will last a long time, but not forever — don’t start using them for ordinary excavation until you have plenty of diamonds. Note that gold tools are weakest of all, and are a waste of gold to craft.

Log collecting technique from trees[]

If you can get to every block of wood on a tree but just can’t reach the top block, try leaving the bottom block intact, then jump on it to get the rest. Once done, harvest the bottom. If you still can’t reach the top you can “pillar jump” up Jump and place a block beneath you (use a block that’s easy to break, like dirt, wood, or stone). Once done, you can mine away from your own blocks, and either break the “tree stump” or leave it to mark the tree’s drops when you come back later. For a “giant” tree with a 2×2 trunk, you can mine only some of the wood to make yourself a spiral staircase up to the top of the tree, and then mine those on the way down. Alternatively, you can also turn a few blocks of wood into ladders to climb right the top of the tree.

The leaf blocks are hoe-type blocks; you can break them slowly by hand or quickly with a hoe, but when mining natural trees, they will also (slowly) break on their own — after you have removed the wood, the leaves will eventually decay. Whether you break them or wait for them to break on their own, they will drop occasional saplings, sticks, and (for oak and dark oak trees) apples that you can collect.

Collecting sand or gravel without using a shovel[]

Instead of wasting a shovel’s durability by digging piles of sand, gravel, or even concrete powder, you can use torches or various other blocks to break entire columns at once. This works with any “passable” block, including rails, redstone dust, or even slabs; but torches are almost always handy since they save a mining player’s life more than any other tool.

For this trick, the player should hold a torch, and use it to break the bottom-most block if a stack then immediately place a torch on the floor of the newly empty space. The column should collapse into a scattering of items. If you placed the torch too fast, the sand, etc. might not have time to start falling, and the torch will just hold them up — in this case just break the next block above the torch as well.

Breaking gravel using this trick will never drop flint, which should be considered by the player depending on the resources they desire.

Also, you can dig down underneath it so that the sand or gravel is two blocks from the floor. Dig out the block that is two blocks away from the gravel, then place a torch there. Mine the block above the torch and the sand or gravel will fall on the torch and will drop as items.

How it works: The pillar of gravity affected blocks will turn into falling block entities, which can land on any full block, but pass through non-solid blocks (much as a player or mob would). If they land in an empty space, they will turn back into a proper block. However, if they land and find there is already a block in that space, they will instead break as an item.

YouTube Video (view on YouTube)

 

Mining Stone and ores[]

When exploring underground or at night, darkness is a huge issue — monsters spawn in the dark! Try to keep at least a half-stack (32) torches on hand at all times, whenever you drop below that make another batch from a log and some coal or charcoal. This will let you light up areas as you pass, and torches can also be used to mark your path. See the section on lighting below for more information. Don’t forget your shovels, either — you will be encountering dirt, gravel, and perhaps sand, and a shovel makes clearing these out much quicker (especially for dirt, where the above torch trick won’t help). Make sure you bring enough wood, for crafting not just torches, but other useful items like ladders and fence gates. (You can make walls out of the cobblestone or other rocks you’re mining).

When looking for ores, there are two main techniques: Go into existing caves or ravines and look for exposed ores (spelunking) or dig your way to the desired level (different ores spawn on different levels) and then dig a mine pattern through the rock. These tend to overlap on the one hand, digging a pattern is likely to run into caves, and on the other, a ravine or cave network can help you get down to the desired level more easily.

Branch mining[]

See the Mining Tutorial for detailed tips on digging tunnels, shafts, and mine patterns. Always be wary of lava and caves that you may dig into. Keep a water bucket in your hotbar to quench unexpected lava spills, and keep torches handy for lighting up both your own tunnels and any caves you encounter.

When looking specifically for diamonds, your main target level is Y=-58. This is right above the bedrock.

Spelunking[]

Find a cave, and explore a branch of the cave, placing torches to light it as you go. If the cave branches off while exploring the current branch, go down one of the paths at random, pick one to explore. If the branches seem to go deep, you can craft fences or walls to block off all but one of the paths, so that monsters won’t come out of that area to surprise you from behind. When you come back, you can just pick up your fences to use them somewhere else (or replace one with a fence gate, for more controlled access). If you have jack-o-lanterns, you can use them to point the way back to the exit, or make other markers. (See the Navigation tutorial.) Note ores as you pass, but don’t start mining until you’ve made the area safe, by lighting it up and blocking off unexplored areas. Remember the pickaxe tiers — if you only have a stone pickaxe, don’t try to mine gold or better until you’ve made an iron pickaxe.

Note that it is entirely fair to make chests in the field, and use them to stash your accumulation of stone blocks. You can even stash the ores and mob drops that you’ve found so far, in case of unexpected death. Make sure the chests are clearly visible and lit, so you can find them later. You can also make a furnace in the field, to smelt some iron and upgrade your stone tools (or make some armor) immediately.

Once you reach a dead end, you can go back and mine the various ores that you’ve passed. Leave the torches that you placed, to keep the area lit and prevent monsters from spawning. Then you can go down another branch of the cave, and repeat the above process until the cave is done. If you hear monsters but can’t see a path to them, you may be near another cave or ravine — if you have a sword and perhaps some armor, try digging a tunnel in the direction the sounds are coming from… but be prepared for a fight, or a hasty retreat!

Masses of dirt and especially gravel can hide more sections of a cave complex, and with a shovel (and the torch trick) they can be easier to get through than stone. But be careful about walking on gravel or sand — it may be unsupported beneath, ready to fall out from under you when you dig or even place a torch. Similarly, if you see “dust” drifting down from the ceiling, that means there is unsupported gravel or sand above you. If you can see and reach the edge of the patch, you might want to carefully set it off by digging a block while you’re not actually under it. If necessary, you can even drop it onto yourself… after placing a torch at your feet to break it as it falls.

Lava flows (“springs”) are mostly an obstacle, as you can see them easily and avoid them. If you can safely reach the source block of a lava spring, you can capture it in a bucket, or just destroy it by placing a block there. You can also try quenching the flow with water, but be careful, sometimes that can make things worse — try to have the water flowing down from above, to cover as much of the stream as possible. Before you quench or remove a lava flow, remember that it can also block monsters, and it is lighting up the area. After removing it, make sure to light up any areas that are now left dark, and explore newly-accessible parts of the cave.

Water flows can help you reach higher areas, but they can also carry monsters to you from those same areas. If they lead up into dark areas, it’s usually a good idea to treat them as a cave branch, swimming up them to light the area. Also be careful that they don’t carry you into lava or other danger.

Ravine mining[]

Ravines are deep cuts into the world, often exposing ores such as coal or iron, or even gold or redstone. They can open onto the surface, or appear deeper within a cave network. They are certainly a quick way to get deeper to reach more advanced ores, but be careful: If you just jump in, you will at least take fall damage, and may well die of it! There are a number of ways to get down more safely:

  • Place a water source at the edge, or dig out the edge of a nearby pool to let water flow in. This will make you a waterfall that you can swim up and down.
    • Check for lava at the bottom first — if your water flows onto lava, it will quench the lava as far as the water flows — about 7 blocks. If a lava lake reaches further than that, the water can wash you straight to your doom! You might want to move the waterfall around a bit, placing your water bucket in different places to quench a wider area. Then you can leave the waterfall in the middle of the safe area, where it can’t reach the lava anymore.
  • You can place sand or gravel at the edge, letting the blocks fall down to make a stack, which you can step onto and then dig your way down. To get back up, just reverse this with classic pillar jumping, or you can make a more permanent exit by placing ladders or building a staircase.
  • Slow but steady: You can dig a staircase down the side of the ravine, being cautious of overhangs and monsters.
  • A more advanced technique is to harvest vines with shears, place some at the edge, and use bonemeal or time to let them grow into a ladder.

Farming techniques[]

Passive mobs will spawn very seldom after they have been killed, which means that meat will eventually run short if the player keeps killing animals without breeding them. The same is true for plants. A solution to this is to make farms. The general rule in Minecraft, not just for food but for a variety of other resources, is that a small investment in time and/or resources can get a modest supply, but a larger investment (usually a larger or more automated farm) can get a much more generous supply. Once you have surplus crops, you can also sell them to villagers to earn emeralds.

Wheat, carrots, potatoes, beets.[]

Most players will start a wheat farm first, because wheat seeds are one of the first items you can find (from breaking tall grass). Note that all methods for wheat will work identically for the other crops, except that carrots and potatoes don’t have separate seeds — you just re-plant the the vegetables (but unlike wheat and beets, you can get more than one of them when you harvest).

Besides seeds, players will need dirt/grass, a hoe, light, and water. One source block of water will hydrate farmland four blocks in every direction, including diagonally. Therefore, the most effective (using a small area) wheat farm is 9×9 with a source block in the middle. You’ll want fences around it to keep out wandering mobs, that will make it 11×11. Again, that one source block extends to all tilled soil in the 9×9 areas. That area yields 80 wheat after fully grown. This not only saves water sources but also gives more room to grow crops for less water. Putting a slab in the water block will let you walk over it without risk of trampling the crop.

When starting out, you can speed up wheat or other crop growth by planting in alternate rows, with empty farmland or a different crop between. However, once you’ve gotten to the point where you can plant a whole field in one crop, the speed isn’t really worth the trouble of mixed crop, as it’s easier to use a water bucket to harvest the whole field at once, and it’s quickest to replant the field in a single crop.

After building your first basic plot for wheat, you can just stack more farms above it, every three blocks, for your other crops. The lighting block for each layer can hold up the water for the next. a half-dozen layers will let you grow all six basic crops (including pumpkin and melon), and harvest whichever crop you want at the moment.

Villagers can be used to automate breaking and replacing of the crops — see the tutorial linked above for more details.

Pumpkin/Melon farms[]

Players will likely find pumpkins first, and these are far more useful: pumpkins provide jack o’lanterns, which are valuable for marking a path and the direction home, and can provide light underwater. Pumpkins can also be used for pumpkin pie, and later to create golems. A carved pumpkin can also be worn on the player’s head to avoid offending endermen. Melons are a small-change food and eventually used for brewing. In any case, the two crops grow almost identically. They do use farmland so the same 9×9 plot with a water block works well, but instead of planting the whole field, you plant (almost) half the squares, which will grow into vines. You will leave the vines and harvest the fruit that grows next to it. See the tutorial above for advice on how to arrange the fields. Both pumpkins and melons make good crops for sale to villagers. Once you’ve been to the Nether, observers and other redstone gadgetry will let you automate pumpkin and melon farming.

Sugar cane farms[]

Once past the initial stage when players eat any food they can without bothering with extra preparations and are ready to craft some more complex items, players may want to start sugar cane farming in order to craft sugar and paper, sugar being a key component of cake, pumpkin pie, and some potions; and paper being required to craft maps, books, bookshelves, cartography tables, enchantment tables, and firework rockets.

Sugar cane can be placed underwater, where it provides an air bubble. This trick can be helpful when building underwater structures.

Observers and pistons can be used to automate sugar cane farms.

Fishing[]

Once you have a couple of pieces of string for a fishing rod, fishing becomes a very useful source of food, experience, and even treasure. Note that fish are in infinite supply, while passive mobs respawn only rarely. Fish, while they do not replenish a lot of hunger, can be much easier to obtain compared to other foods. Here is also a chance to fish up treasure such as saddles and enchanted bows and fishing rods. See fishing for more information.

You will eventually catch enchanted fishing rods, and once you get into enchanting you can even create your own. Caught rods will have little durability, but can be saved to combine (at an anvil) as below. Any rod with Mending will tend to repair itself with use instead of wearing out, especially if it also has Unbreaking. Fishing rods do have a “perfect” enchantment setup, and it’s straightforward to create: Once you make a “god rod” with Mending, Unbreaking III, Lure III, and Luck of the Sea III, it will last forever and provide a steady stream of experience, food, and treasure.

Animal farming[]

A simple pig farm, with a carrot farm right next to it to make it easy to breed the pigs.

Ranching, or animal farming, usually refers to breeding animals so that there can be an infinite supply of meat and other passive mob drops. Simply right-click an animal with their “desired” food to breed, and then right-click the same animal with that same food (see “Breeding” for more) To make a simple animal farm, simply make an enclosure with fences and one fence gate to access the farm. Then, lead at least 2 of the animal into the corral and start breeding them. A carpet atop a fence post can also make an entrance which you can easily jump onto, but the animals (or monsters, for that matter) will not recognize it as passable. Having a crop farm nearby will help supply food for breeding.

Chickens are easiest to start with, as you can “breed” them by breaking their eggs inside the corral, as well as by feeding them any kind of seed. Cows and sheep will need to wait until you have wheat to breed them, and pigs will need one of the root vegetables (carrot, potato, or beets). You may even be able to raise rabbits (they eat carrots or dandelions) but you will need high fences or a deep pit to keep them from jumping out and escaping. More advanced farms can simplify the business: Even a basic cow-crusher can practically industrialize your beef supply, and variously automated chicken farms can produce batches or streams of cooked or raw meat and feathers. Sheep are usually farmed for their wool, and that can likewise be automated.

[]

Even basic farms will rapidly produce a lot of food, to the point of oversupply. Once you’ve got a chestful of cooked meat, you’re pretty much set — only a few exotic foods can even compete. In general, it’s worth saving some extra oversupply — remember, chests are cheap. However, at some point it will be time to just stop slaughtering animals or harvesting crops at a given farm until you actually need more to cut off the oversupply. Automatic farms can be turned off, or excess crops routed to an auto-composter to make bone meal. In multiplayer, one player with a farm can support others if he/she has enough food. Crops can often be fed to animals, and crops and meat can both be sold to villagers to get emeralds(see the Trading Hall tutorial). Note that food is generally sold to villagers uncooked, so don’t cook everything up front unless you will eat it in the future.

Stuck in the Nether[]

It is common knowledge that the player should always have a flint and steel or a fire charge in the inventory in the Nether, just in case. Building a cobblestone house around your portal will also protect it from ghasts and prevent Nether mobs from wandering through. Always remember the coordinates of the portal so you can find your way back!

If a player is stuck in the Nether without a flint and steel or a fire source, there are still ways to relight the Nether portal.

  • Baiting a ghast into blasting the empty portal again will work, as ghasts can light nether portals just as destroying nether portals.
  • Nether fortress and other structures may have chests with flint-and-steel or fire charges to relight the portal. They can also provide obsidian to build a new one.
  • The makings of a fire charge can also be harvested in the Nether and Nether Fortresses, if the chests are not being helpful: A ghast drops gunpowder, A blaze provides a blaze rod, and a wither skeleton drops coal, which all three can be combined without a crafting table to make a fire charge.
  • Gold can be mined in the Nether, and then traded to Piglins to get a fire charge and perhaps obsidian. They can alternatively give you enough iron nuggets to make a flint-and-steel (gravel is common in the Nether, especially in the nether wastes and soul sand valley biomes). Nether Gold Ore needs at least a stone pickaxe, but you also make stone tools from blackstone, which you can find in the Nether in bastions and many low Y-axis areas.
  • If you kill yourself in some sheltered spot, your items will drop and you will respawn in the Overworld. In single player, time won’t pass (much) in the Nether while you’re in the overworld, so you can more-or-less take your time about getting new equipment, then go back to quickly fetch your stuff. Naturally, you’d like to do this someplace where your items won’t be burned up or stolen by monsters.
  • Pro Tip: Don’t get stuck in the Nether. It’s not fun since a lot of hostile mobs spawn there.

Item storage[]

In general, Minecraft rewards pack-ratting — you never know when you might need those stacks of dirt for terraforming, or cobblestone to build a mob farm or something. Most of the items in the game have at least some use, if only as compost. At some point, you’ll want to set up some kind of central storage in your base, classically a “chest room”. You’ll want to label those chests — item frames can be useful, but remember that having too many of them in one place can produce serious lag and slow down the game. Some surprising items are salable to villagers, and every little bit helps — stashing even your rotten flesh instead of destroying it can net you a few extra emeralds down the line. Some items, like phantom membranes, become more important later in the game.

Once you have picked up some spare blaze rods, you can make an ender chest to store items and get at them from elsewhere. You will need a second ender chest to take with you, and a Silk Touch pickaxe to pick it up after using it. If you don’t have Silk Touch, you can at least install ender chests at your main bases.

Late in the game, you can craft shulker boxes to store extra items later on in the game. These shulker boxes can then be stored inside an ender chest. Color code the shulker boxes to create an organized inventory. This basically gives you an extremely large backpack that keeps your items after death. Note that the shulker boxes are only safe if they’re actually in the ender chest (or somewhere safe) when you die because they can still despawn like any other dropped item!

That said, eventually you’ll start having an accumulation of useless items lying around. Low-tier tools can be merged in repairs, used up for minor tasks, or left as backups in field chests. Iron and gold tools (and armor) can be smelted into nuggets. Wooden scraps can be used for furnace fuel. Although diamond or netherite tools/weapons/armor cannot be smelted or burned as fuel, it can be used until it breaks since the items have a good durability anyways.

A “minor task” is similar to mining stone during a mining operation, which can be mined using any pickaxe, even as simple as a wooden pickaxe. For example, by bringing several weak pickaxes and your best pickaxe on a mining operation, you can use the weaker pickaxes to mine stone instead of wasting durability on your best pickaxe before you find diamonds or a better ore and using your best pickaxe to mine it.

Many players dispose of unwanted items by dropping them into fire pits, lava, and cacti to destroy the items. But by doing so they risk accidentally dropping something valuable and losing it forever, like a diamond pickaxe. So rather than destroying the items, a smarter method of getting rid of items is to drop them into a hole with a trapdoor over it, eventually the items will despawn. By doing this you can easily recover items that you accidentally drop; plus you can’t pick up items through closed trapdoors so you don’t have to worry about accidentally picking up unwanted items.

Bucket jumping[]

To ascend a cliff, an alternative to ladders or pillar jumping is to use a bucket of water to place water as high as possible, then swim to the top of the waterfall, put the water back into the bucket, and quickly place a new waterfall at an even higher point. By repeating this process, a player can reach the top of the cliff. If the waterfall is left there, it can be used to travel back and forth.

The player can also jump off a high point and dump the bucket of water onto the ground before they touch the ground so they can land safely in the water.

Buckets of lava can also do the second trick if the player has fire resistance potions, but it might be harder if the fall distance is too short or a lot of flammable structures or blocks are nearby. A good way is to drink a 3-minute fire resistance potion before jumping. This trick is good for the nether since water dries immediately when placed and the nether is filled with lots of high ledges and ridges. You might not want to do this near your base.

Ascending and descending[]

Oftentimes when you are on your adventure, you need to either go up or go down a significant height, usually a high cliff or overhang. Following is a few methods that can be used to traverse vertically.

  • If there is a relatively straight wall to one side, blocks can be placed to form a staircase in both directions. If there isn’t and you are going up, find or place a raised block than the surroundings, sneak to the edge, look to the side and place a block, then jump and place another block above it; repeat the process which forms a staircase until you reach the destination.
  • Water can be poured to the edge, creating a flowing water column or stream to descend and later ascend, as well as a water surface to the bottom to land safely.
  • If the cliff is a straight wall, either ladders or vines can be placed to go up and later go back down.
  • Warped vines can be planted on the ground and bone meal applied which can be climbed to reach the destination up high and later go back down. Similarly, weeping vines can be hung and fed on the ceiling to reach down the ground and later back up.
  • Scaffoldings can be easily stacked to temporarily reach something up high, and after the task is done, as easily knocked down by breaking the bottom block. They can also be installed permanently to move up and down between vertical locations.

Video[]

If you still want more tips into survival, check out these videos. These are basically chunks of information to get you started.



FAQs

What should I do first in Minecraft survival?

Survival Guide: Things to Do First in Minecraft

  1. Step One: Build a Crafting Table.
  2. Step Two: Build Tools.
  3. Step Three: Build a Shelter to Survive the Night.
  4. Step Four: Understanding the Hunger Meter and Gathering Food.
  5. Survived Your First Night? Here’s What to Do Next.
  6. 11 Essential Tips and Tricks for Surviving in Minecraft.

Nov 5, 2021

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What are some cool Minecraft tricks?

Tips and Tricks – Things Minecraft Doesn’t Tell you

  • Torches create Temporary air pockets underwater. …
  • Torches break stacks of sand and gravel. …
  • Torches can hold up sand and gravel. …
  • You can build off of torches. …
  • Signs and ladders stop water and lava. …
  • Blazes hate snowballs. …
  • Soul Sand makes you sink.

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What is Minecraft survival goal?

In Minecraft Survival, the main goal is to survive, build, explore, and have fun, but also an optional goal in Survival is to defeat the ender dragon and the wither.

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Part of a video titled HARDEST ITEM to MAKE in MINECRAFT?! – YouTube

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How many hours is 100 days in Minecraft?

Achievements. Play for 100 days. Play for 100 Minecraft days, which is equivalent to 33 hours in real time.

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Part of a video titled How to Become The Most Powerful Person in Minecraft – YouTube

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How do you become the most powerful player in Minecraft?

On Windows, PC, and Mac, you should click the space key twice. On Android or iPhone for Minecraft PE, click the jump button twice. On PS3 and PS4, tap on the X button twice. On Xbox One or 360, use the A button twice.

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How do you defeat the Ender dragon?

Break into the cage with your pickaxe, and wait for the dragon to fly away, since it cannot break the iron bars. If you have strong enough armor and are affected by Absorption, hit the caged crystal with your sword. Otherwise, build a few blocks away from the crystal and shoot it with your bow or crossbow.

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Why do beds hurt the Ender dragon?

Because the game forbids the player from establishing a respawn point in the End, attempting to use a bed there will cause it to burst into an explosion of flames. Humorously, this explosion is a fantastic weapon to utilize against the Ender Dragon and is far easier to obtain than TNT.

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Can the Ender dragon see invisibility?

The dragon cannot see you if you have the invisibility buff, provided you are wearing no armour and do nothing aggressive. As soon as you do anything that harms the dragon, including hitting the crystals, it will track you, and you will not last long without armour.

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What is the hardest block to get in Minecraft?

Risk-wise, the single most difficult block to obtain is the activated Regeneration Beacon, since there are many steps to it, and many of these steps are very risky to make. Compared to Netherite, it may not take as long to obtain, but it’s definitely harder to do so.

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What is the least used Minecraft block?

The Cartography Table is one of the least used blocks in Minecraft. Its only use is to play around with maps, allowing them to be cloned, expanded and locked. Many players only see Cartography Tables in villages and then proceed to never think about them ever again.

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Part of a video titled Why Hard Difficulty In Minecraft Is Actually EASIER – YouTube

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Why is Minecraft Survival so hard?

Hardcore Minecraft is the most common way to spice up a Survival playthrough, mainly because of its easy accessibility to Java players. Hardcore is one of the difficulty settings built into the Java version of Minecraft, meaning players don’t have to download any mods or world maps to hop into a Hardcore world.

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Does the warden spawn in peaceful?

The Warden can be spawned in peaceful difficulty, which is not supposed to since the Warden is considered a hostile mob on Java Edition. 1. Set your difficulty to peaceful mode.

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Can you drown in peaceful mode?

No, you can’t drown in peaceful mode.

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Minecraft Guide: Best 15 pro survival tips and tricks that you …

Minecraft Guide: Best 15 pro survival tips and tricks that you must know Minecraft is one of the most successful and popular games of all time. It is a sandbox video game developed by Mojang. The game was created by Markus “Notch” Persson in the Java programming language. Minecraft has been ported to several other platforms and is the best-selling video game of all time, with 200 million copies sold and 126 million monthly active users as of 2020. Game modes include a survival mode, in which players must acquire resources to build the world and maintain health. There are several top survival tips you absolutely need to remember to become a pro in Minecraft. With this list, we’ve got you covered. These points are in no particular order and each one of them is something you want to follow if you want to survive and thrive in Minecraft. 1. Use the coordinates feature In the game settings, turn on the coordinates. Whenever you’re playing, sit down with a notepad or take screenshots of important places so that you have their coordinates and can come back if you need to. These important places could be your main base, a village, a stronghold or any other structure to which you intend to return to. Know all the important coordinates 2. Need a clock or a compass? You don’t have to craft them to use them This is a trick everyone should know. Clocks and compasses aren’t used all that often but take up space in your inventory and require resources. Instead of crafting them, simply head over to your crafting recipes and the clock and compass over there can work even without crafting them. There is no need to craft to use a clock or compass 3. Stay safe underground Being resource-rich, caves are also equally dangerous. Always use torches to keep areas lit, keep a weapon on your hotbar at all times and wear armour. If you want to take extra precautions, a shield won’t hurt. Always light up your mines as dark places are breeding ground for hostile mobs 4. Always carry a water bucket One should make it a point to carry a water bucket in Minecraft. Whether it be to get down a ravine, walk over lava or save yourself from a tall fall. Water buckets are a multipurpose tool that you should always carry. 5. Keep an eye on the durability of your tools It’s always very frustrating when you’re mining and your last pickaxe breaks or you’re trying to take down a horde of zombies when your sword breaks or your elytra breaks while you’re flying around in your world. Remember it’s cheaper to fix up your gear instead of making a new one when it breaks. As the saying goes “A stitch in time saves nine”. 6. Trap in villagers every time you find a village This one might sound a bit cruel… But if you want to find villagers to trade with, trapping them in would stop them from wandering off or getting killed and some of the ways of doing this are walling up the village or blocking the doors of the houses as the villagers go to sleep. You’re just protecting them from zombies after all! 7. Walls and torches save lives Building walls is something very important if you want to stay safe. Be it to protect your house or to stop creepers from sneaking up behind you while you’re tending to your crops. Walling up areas stops mobs from getting in while lighting up those areas will stop mobs from spawning in. Walls keep out hostile mobs. Torches stop them from spawning in! 8. Storage Wars Having an efficient and neat storage system would increase your productivity and make life in Minecraft much simpler. Keep your mining tools close to your mines, keep your food in a separate chest from your wood and if you’re…

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Survival Guide: Things to Do First in Minecraft – IGN

Survival Guide: Things to Do First in Minecraft – Minecraft Wiki Guide – IGNMinecraft can be a daunting game. Aside from a nearly endless world to explore, you’ll encounter dozens of deadly enemies, hundreds of craftable items, and several mechanics that are never properly explained through tutorials. If you’re having trouble coming to grips with this open-ended game, here are the things you should do first in Minecraft if you’re looking to survive. Looking for something in particular? Click the links below to jump to a particular step… advertisement Step One: Build a Crafting Table Step Two: Build Tools Step Three: Build a Shelter to Survive the Night Step Four: Understanding the Hunger Meter and Gathering Food Survived Your First Night? Here’s What to Do Next 11 Essential Tips and Tricks for Surviving in MinecraftA Complete Beginner’s Guide to Surviving in MinecraftIn this part of the beginner’s guide, we’ll teach you how to harvest material, build your first tools, and establish a shelter where you can spend your nights in peace, comfort, and quiet. Note: The controls for PC listed in the guide are the defaults. Pressing Esc opens the pause menu, and from there you can change your controls by clicking “Options” and “Controls.”Step One: Build a Crafting TableThe first objective to set for yourself is simple: Build a Crafting Table. In order to do so, you’ll need to attack a tree to gather some Woodblocks. You can obtain wood by holding down the left mouse button on PC or the right trigger on your console controller. The process should require around 15 quick hits with your fist whilst aiming at a tree and the log will break so that you can pick it up. Make sure that you replant any Saplings that fall from the overhead leaf blocks. After a while, they will grow into trees. You should also try and break the leaves on the tree to try and get some apples, they are quick and easy to obtain and you will need them for later. About 16 wood will do for now, trees will always be available if you need any more. Note: While it may seem obvious, make sure that you hold down the button. This will allow you to dig into your target, instead of merely punching it.advertisementYou can now use your newly acquired log blocks to create Wooden Planks. Go into the crafting screen in your inventory (tap “E” on PC, Mac, or Linux) and drag the wood block into one of the crafting slots at the top of the screen. On Xbox, this action is even easier: just hit X and select the wooden planks. “Wooden Planks” should appear in the box on the right–click the wooden planks or hit X to turn your wood blocks into planks, which have a wider variety of uses than wood in its purest form. On PC/Mac/Linux, remove any wood blocks left in the crafting area and then fill all four spots in the crafting area with these new wooden planks, which will then output a crafting table. On consoles, open the crafting menu and select the table from the menu to build it. Move the crafting table into the bottom row of your inventory. Exit the crafting screen by pressing E on PC or B on your Xbox controller, and you should be able to hold the crafting table in your hands. Find a suitable spot to place the table by right-clicking on PC/Mac/Linux or hitting L on Xbox. Once the crafting table is set, you can right-click or press L on the table to access more advanced crafting options. Note: If you ever need to move the crafting table to another spot, just break it apart with your punches and pick up…

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Tutorials/Tips and tricks – Minecraft Wiki – Fandom

Tutorials/Tips and tricks This article needs cleanup to comply with the style guide. [discuss]Please help improve this page. The talk page may contain suggestions.Reason: This is a tutorial page, so the second person is more appropriate Here are some little hints for those who are new or would like to learn more tips and tricks about Minecraft. Tips may also be found under the “Trivia” section of some pages, and those are likely to be more in-depth. Controls[] Controls can be fully customized in nearly all versions of Minecraft. By opening settings and navigating to the Controls option, the player can change their key mappings to whatever they wish. In the Bedrock Edition, a touchscreen, keyboard and mouse, a controller, or just a keyboard may be used to control the game. However, Java Edition only supports keyboard and mouse control. Some additional control related options, such as auto jump, and sprint/sneaking toggle/hold settings can be changed. Finding directions[] Within the Minecraft world, a compass is not how you tell which way is north! Rather, it always points to a fixed point, the “world spawn”. However, it can be useful to know which way north is. There are a few ways: North can be found by hitting a block and checking the directions of the cracks which occur on a block as it is mined. This may not work if a resource pack that changes the crack pattern is being used. First, learn the crack pattern. If a block is hit on its side, there should be one crack going almost straight up, one to the right, and one going almost straight down. If a block on the ground is hit, the same crack pattern will appear. The crack which went almost straight up on the side of the block, will point north on the top of a block. You can watch which direction the sun, moon, stars, or clouds are moving. Each of these always moves from east to west. In the Java Edition, the debug screen (activated by pressing F3) gives information on which way the player is facing. If you have a map (In Bedrock Edition, a locator map) covering where you are, the map will show an arrow-like player icon. This points the same way that you are facing in the world. The top of the map is north, the right edge is east, and so on. Changing the rules[] Peaceful mode[] If you are having too much difficulty with hostile mobs, such as a zombie or a creeper, or can’t find any food to eat, you may be able to set the world difficulty to peaceful. When you change to peaceful mode, hunger and health will quickly regenerate, the hunger bar will never decrease, and all hostile mobs will instantly despawn. However, this is a controversial move — in a pure survival game, many players will consider it to be cheating, which takes away much of what they see as the challenge and fun of Minecraft, especially when used as a “panic button”. That said, it’s better than a ragequit, and Minecraft is meant to accommodate many different styles of play. When the “point” of your own game is more about construction or artistic builds than about surviving the monsters, peaceful mode becomes very helpful. It can also be used as a “training” mode to learn the game controls and get used to the Minecraft world. Single-player worlds have an option…

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Minecraft: 20 Tricks From The Game Players Have No Idea …

Minecraft: 20 Tricks From The Game Players Have No Idea About After so many years of updates and evolution, Minecraft has come really far from its humble beginnings. It started out as a passion project and has turned into one of the biggest gaming franchises in existence. One of the defining games of this modern generation. Such a grand feat means you’re going to have new people constantly joining in on the fun. With how complex Minecraft has become, newcomers may need a little guidance to figure out some of the intricate details of the game. Fans have spent hours exploring the many secrets and hidden details within Minecraft. There are hundreds of these tricks stored away within the game. With new mobs and items added every update, there will often be a whole bunch of new secrets to uncover. The game is so expansive and is limited only by the creativity of the player. You should definitely take the time to explore the world of Minecraft and see how many new things you can find on your own. However, if you want a head start, we’ve rounded up the very best tips here. Updated on May 30, 2022, by Gabrielle Huston: As we mentioned, Minecraft is updated often with brand new content, so we can’t become complacent! Some tips have been updated out, some tips have been disproved, some tips are still just as valuable as ever. We’ve updated this list to keep it fresh for you! 20 Placing Torches On Crafting Tables This is more for the looks than for any practical reason. But you can actually place a torch on top of a crafting table or furnace. Why you would do this isn’t important. It’s about the fact that you can. To do this, put a “transparent block” behind the crafting table. This can be something like a block of glass. Now, while facing the crafting table, try to reach out and put a torch on the glass. You should now have a torch on top of the table. 19 Lava Buckets Are Great Fuel If you find lava anywhere, be sure to keep it marked. As soon as you get some buckets, go and collect as much lava as possible. Lava is an excellent fuel to use in the furnace. It lasts a long time so you can smelt as much as you want. Lava is also one of the ingredients in creating obsidian, a rare block. With a bonus use like that, there’s no reason not to carry lava. Get as many buckets of this as possible and become an efficient adventurer. 18 The Best Diamond Level Prior to Minecraft 1.17, Diamonds were most likely to spawn at Y-levels 5 through 12. Going any further down than that wouldn’t increase the likelihood of you finding diamonds, and in fact would increase your likelihood of encountering lava. As of Minecraft 1.18, the game has been updated to change the way that Diamonds spawn. Now, you’ll find diamonds at Y-levels 15 through -63. Y-level -64 is basically just bedrock. Rather than only appearing most often in certain Y-levels, diamonds just get more and more likely the further down you are. So start digging! 17 Use Torches To Farm Sand/Gravel Blocks Torches are probably some of the most versatile items in all of Minecraft. They do the obvious things like lighting up dark areas and keeping monsters away. However, they have some other useful abilities. As you may know, Sand and Gravel blocks are affected by gravity. So, if you remove the block underneath, they will fall. At that moment before the block falls, you can place a torch. This will cause all of the blocks to be broken allowing you to collect them. As a fun bonus tip, you could also place a torch beneath you when digging upwards to prevent Gravel or Sand from falling and killing you! 16 Zombie-Proof Your Door Zombies can break down your door and invade your precious house. Thankfully, there…

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Minecraft: 10 Tips For Safely Building In Survival Mode

Minecraft: 10 Tips For Safely Building In Survival Mode Minecraft is having yet another resurgence, which isn’t surprising considering the game continues to set video game sales records to this day. The creative and educational block-based experience features plenty of different modes for players to explore all facets of their imagination and exploratory desires. Though creative mode exists, many builders like the idea of crafting worlds in an active world that’s working against them. It’s important to know how to avoid enemies and destruction if building structures and designing a world inside of a world is of utmost importance. 10 Watch Your Back This may sound like an obvious tip but it’s surprising how many Minecraft players are oblivious to their surroundings. The biggest issue standing between these players and living a safe existence in a blocky world is playing with sound. The game does a great job of providing sound cues for all of the enemies and knowing is half the battle. There’s nothing worse than working with rare materials on a building project you just completed only for a creeper to come out of nowhere and explode half of the structure. 9 Use Block Height To Your Advantage A thing players often forget is that almost all of the enemies in Minecraft can’t ascend a 2-block difference in terms of terrain. This means that if players are building on a well-lit hill and all of the edges are two blocks in height they’ll have no trouble avoiding enemies that spawn in the dark wilds and forests. Some players prefer building moats or one-block wide bottomless pits, but having a raised edge to a building area allows players to easily expand if they want or need to and can do it in specific directions without worrying about it. 8 Pace Yourself A trend that happens far too often in Minecraft is when builders commit to giant building projects and quickly become overwhelmed at the project as a whole. This is why it’s best to start small and pace out building projects and ideas accordingly. Larger projects should either be tackled in segments or only focused on when there’s plenty of building help at the player’s side. Games are meant to be fun, and though fun can be had building things in Minecraft, the act of building things shouldn’t get in the way of enjoying the game. 7 Explore And Find New Materials Minecraft is a game that’s maintained massive popularity for years and every 12 months seems to bring in a whole new audience of gamers. Players will often leave Minecraft only to come back to it months or years later after the game has seen numerous updates. It’s important to understand that the game adds new materials and objects and these things can be useful. Not only can newer blocks add new design choices when building but certain new objects can help craft items that add decorative layers to the interiors. 6 Have Building Days And Gathering Days As much as people may love some things, it’s always important to practice moderation. Everyone is familiar with either their friends or themselves experiencing burnout with a hobby or interest simply due to going over the top and committing to it at an extreme level. For Minecraft builders to avoid this the best thing to do is have gather days and building days. Doing this will help players avoid burnout and creative fatigue while at the same time making sure that supplies are replenished and stress is reduced all around. 5 Don’t Be Afraid To Experiment The creative mode in Minecraft is a stress-free place for builders and crafters to experiment and try out new ideas. This sense of freedom goes away in survival mode as the cleanup for mistakes is a lot more time-intensive. In turn, this makes builds end up coming across a lot safer as the desire to experiment fades in favor of efficiency. The best way for players to experiment…

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50 EASY Minecraft SURVIVAL TIPS! Ultimate Guide 2019

Best Pro Tips and Tricks for Survival In Minecraft

Best Pro Tips and Tricks for Survival In Minecraft Minecraft is a game about creating anything you can imagine out of blocks. Monsters appear at night, so you must build a refuge before then. During the day, you can explore the world and gather resources to build more powerful tools, weapons, and structures. Minecraft has multiple modes, however, the main two modes are creative and survival. In creative mode, you have an unlimited number of blocks to build with and you can’t die. In survival mode, you have a limited number of blocks and if you’re not careful you will die. The first thing you need to do in Minecraft is find some food. Then, start building a shelter before it gets dark. Once your shelter is complete, make sure to keep yourself well-fed and comfortable so you can survive the night. In the morning, explore your surroundings and gather resources to help you survive. Some helpful tips for survival in Minecraft include: 1. Use the Coordinates Feature The coordinates feature in Minecraft is incredibly useful for finding your way around. By pressing F3, a player can see their current coordinates at the top of the screen. The first number is the x-coordinate, the second is the y-coordinate, and the third is the z-coordinate. The coordinates can help you find your way back to your spawn point or help you find resources. 2. Stay Safe Underground When exploring caves, it is important to be careful. There are many hazards underground, such as lava and mobs. If you are not careful, you can easily die. It is best to bring plenty of food and water with you, as well as a few torches to light your way. 3. Always Carry a Water Bucket Water is essential for survival in Minecraft. If you are caught in a rainstorm, your best bet is to find a tree and climb it. If you are in the desert, you will need to find a cactus and break it open to get water. It is also a good idea to carry a water bucket with you so you can fill it up when you find water. 4. Make a Bed As soon as possible, make a bed in your shelter. If you die in Minecraft, you will respawn at your bed. If you don’t have a bed, you will respawn at the world’s spawn point. Having a bed gives you a place to respawn if you die and it also allows you to set your spawn point. 5. Collect Wood Wood is one of the most important resources in Minecraft. It can be used to create tools, weapons, and structures. Start collecting wood as soon as possible so you can have a stockpile for when you need it. 6. Build a Furnace A furnace is a Crafting Table that can smelt ores. To build a furnace, you will need eight Cobblestones. Place six Cobblestones in the Bottom and Middle slots of the crafting table and then place a Wood Log in the Top slot. This will give you one Furnace. 7. Craft Torches Torches are important for lighting your way in the dark. To craft a torch, you will need Coal and Stick. Place the Coal in the Top slot of the crafting table and then place a Stick in the Bottom slot. This will give you four Torches. 8. Collect Stone Stone is another important resource in Minecraft. It can be used to create tools, weapons, and structures. Start collecting stone as soon as possible so you can have a stockpile for when you need them. 9. Make Use of Free Internet Resources There are many helpful tools and resources available for Minecraft players. Here are a few of the best: The Minecraft sphere generator is a free tool that allows players to create spheres in Minecraft. The Minecraft Wiki is a comprehensive resource for everything Minecraft. It includes information on items, blocks,…

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15 Little Known Minecraft Tips to Up Your Game! – CodaKid

15 Little Known Minecraft Tips to Up Your Game! – CodaKid It’s been a little over a decade since Mojang Studios released their award-winning game, Minecraft. Since then, players have tirelessly explored this sandbox world, consuming everything it has had to offer.  From hidden worlds to helpful cheats, player-created Minecraft mods to detailed walk-throughs, there’s never a lack of content in the Minecraft community. Related Reading: Minecraft – A Parent’s Survival Guide What are Minecraft Mods? A Quick Guide for Parents [Updated 2021 Edition] Thus, it should come as no surprise that several dedicated, patient Minecraft players have uncovered some wildly unexpected – but incredibly useful! – in-game hacks. All of which help make the Minecraft experience just a little easier. We’ve taken 15 of those hacks and listed them all down in this ultimate Minecraft guide! Want to avoid angering Endermen? Tired of Zombies breaking into your house? Don’t have any potions of water breathing but still wanna explore that deep lake nearby? Keep reading to find out how! Wooden Slabs are Fireproof Minecraft already has some pretty wonky physics. It should come as no surprise that they have their own set of natural laws as well. In real life, raw wood is flammable. In Minecraft? Not so much. They can still catch fire, unfortunately, but they don’t get destroyed. They stay on fire until you put it out. Very useful if you want to craft a wooden house with a bunch of fire sources in it. You could, in theory, also use it for aesthetic reasons (like a roof that’s perpetually alight with fire). However, this could be – quite literally – a fire hazard. Remember that other Minecraft blocks aren’t as flame-retardant and plan accordingly! You Can Walk Through Walls with a Boat Is this a fun little hack that the creators left in for players to find? A serious glitch that they just haven’t fixed yet? Or an actual part of Minecraft’s laws of physics? Who knows. All we know is, you can use a humble boat to walk through walls. You don’t necessarily get to sail through one, but it’s a programming imperative that’s pretty fun to exploit. Simply place a boat in front of a wall and gently push it into the blocks of the wall until about half the boat is inside. Then, left-click on the boat to enter it. Once your avatar is in the boat, left-shift to exit. Since players always exit the boat via the front half, you’ll find that you’ve somehow glitched through the wall via the boat entrance-exit dynamics. Again, a very cool Minecraft trick that’s useful to know (especially when you need to make a quick escape). Do keep in mind that it’s a one-way trip, though! Since you can only exit via the front of the boat, going in and out will keep you on the side of the wall that the bow’s on. Invisible Blocks are a Thing No, really! You can actually spawn and place blocks that are completely invisible but still function like regular Minecraft blocks. They’re not just see-through, like glass or ice blocks. They genuinely can’t be seen (unless you’re the person who placed them—then you can see a thin outline). This only works in Creative mode, though, but it’s still a neat trick! To summon an invisible block, type the…

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Flying and Your Child’s Ears (for Parents)




Overview

What is airplane ear?

Airplane ear happens when your ears are affected by air pressure inside an airplane. Normally, air pressure inside and outside the ears is the same. However, when a plane takes off or starts its descent to land, the rapid change in altitude changes the air pressure inside the cabin.

When this happens, you may notice an uncomfortable pressure or blockage in the ears. Others may hear a pop within the ears or feel temporary pain. Once the ears adjust upon landing, airplane ear goes away. In a small number of cases, the pain or blocked feeling may remain. If this happens, you should talk to a healthcare provider.

How common is airplane ear?

Airplane ear is quite common, but it affects everyone differently. Some may feel pain, while others complain of only slight discomfort (or have no pain at all). If you have a cold or an ear infection, the symptoms may be even more uncomfortable.

Most people recover quickly from airplane ear once the plane has landed and air pressure has been equalized.


Symptoms and Causes

How does a person get airplane ear?

The Eustachian tubes are slim tubes that connect the ear with the nose and throat. They open and shut every time you swallow or yawn to keep the air pressure even between the ears and the nose/throat. If air pressure changes too quickly for the Eustachian tube to react, then there may be too little or too much air behind the ear drum. You can feel this pressure difference. It can also interfere with sounds vibrating through the ear drum and the hearing bones.

Every time a plane takes off (ascends) and lands (descends), the air pressure changes and the ears need to adapt. Until the Eustachian tubes equalize the pressure, the difference between the inside and outside pushes on the eardrum. This pressure difference causes it to hurt and not work properly. Sounds may also become muffled.

The discomfort of airplane ear worsens when flying with a cold, nasal congestion or allergies.

What are the symptoms of airplane ear?

When an airplane is ascending or descending, the following symptoms can occur:

  • Blocked ears.
  • Discomfort or pain deep inside the ears.
  • Muffled hearing.

Symptoms are more common with descent (landing), but usually clear after the plane lands.


Diagnosis and Tests

How is airplane ear diagnosed?

Airplane ear usually goes away once the plane lands. A formal medical diagnosis is usually unnecessary. However, call your doctor if you have any of the following symptoms:

Your doctor will examine the ears, may order a hearing test (audiometry) or measurement of ear drum pressure (tympanometry). The doctor may then suggest options to alleviate the symptoms of blockage and pain.


Management and Treatment

What can be done to relieve symptoms of airplane ear?

Suggestions to help ease the discomfort of airplane ear include:

  • Stay awake during takeoff and landing. This will help the passenger be more aware of changes in the ears, and so better able to react.
  • Swallow and yawn when ear discomfort begins. This helps the Eustachian tubes open. The more they open, the more the Eustachian tubes can even out the air pressure. With babies, it is helpful to feed them or give them a drink or a pacifier at the time of the airplane’s descent so that they will swallow.
  • Chew gum during the flight, especially during takeoff and before the plane begins its descent, to help equalize the pressure.
  • Blow your nose gently into a tissue to alleviate pressure.
  • Blow air through your nose while closing your mouth and pinching your nose. This simple exercise allows more air to get into the Eustachian tubes.
  • Take a decongestant if you suffer from a cold or allergies. It may help clear up your ears before the plane lands.
  • Wear ear plugs to help regulate pressure within the ears.

What are the complications associated with airplane ear?

Complications from airplane ear are rare. Rarely, severe pressure in the ears may result in a perforated (ruptured) eardrum, which happens with sudden pain that goes away quickly. Usually a perforated eardrum will heal without medical attention after a few weeks. Call your doctor right away if you experience these symptoms that may occur with perforated eardrum:

  • Hearing loss.
  • Ringing in your ears.
  • Discharge from your ears.
  • Nausea from a spinning sensation (vertigo).


Prevention

Can airplane ear be prevented?

During the flight, it is best to stay awake during the plane’s takeoff and landing, the time when a person’s ears are more susceptible to airplane ear. Chewing gum, eating or drinking during these times will keep the Eustachian tubes more open. Decongestants taken before the flight may help the Eustachian tubes open better when the pressure changes.

Who is at risk of developing airplane ear?

Anyone who flies on an airplane can get airplane ear. Those with very narrow or small Eustachian tubes (such as young children) are especially prone to it and may experience worse symptoms. Anyone who’s had recurring ear infections or ruptured ear drums in the past are also more prone to ear problems with air travel.


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When should I call my doctor about airplane ear?

If your ears remain blocked, hearing does not return to normal or if pain persists several hours after landing, contact your doctor. Bleeding, dizziness or drainage from the ears are signs of ear damage and should be checked by your doctor. The doctor will examine your ears and may order a hearing test (audiometry) or ear pressure test (tympanometry) to make sure there is not a more serious issue.

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Airplane ear: How to avoid ear pain and popping during flight

Airplanes and ear pain: Why it happens and what you can do Contributed by Joy Victory, managing editor, Healthy HearingLast updated April 6, 2021 Regardless of how much you paid for your seat, how much leg room you have or whether you are flying first class or coach, one thing many air travelers have in common is ear discomfort. Ear pressure, popping and even severe pain do not discriminate.  While most ear discomfort during air travel is nothing more than an annoyance, what happens when it becomes more serious? Unfortunately, the ear pain and pressure does, in rare cases, lead to severe pain and hearing loss, so it is best to take precautions, before, during and after your flight.  Increased pressure on ears  Air travel can mean ear trouble if you’re  not prepared.  It all comes down to fluctuation in air pressure. Normally the air pressure inside the inner ear and the air pressure outside are essentially the same, or at least not different enough to cause any trouble. Even if you were to hike to the top of a tall mountain, the slow speed of your ascent would allow time for the pressure to equalize along the way. A problem only occurs when the change in altitude is so rapid, like it is in air travel, that the pressure inside the inner ear and the air pressure outside don’t have time to equalize. This is known medically as ear barotrauma. When your flight takes off and the plane begins its ascent, the air pressure inside the inner ear quickly surpasses that of the pressure outside. The tympanic membrane or eardrum swells outward. Picture a loaf of bread rising while baking, and you get the idea. Conversely, if air pressure inside the inner ear rapidly becomes less than the air pressure outside, the tympanic membrane will be sucked inward, almost like a vacuum effect. What has happened is that the Eustachian tube has flattened and needs a bit of help from you to continue to do its job of bringing air into the inner ear. Whether ascending or descending, the stretching of the eardrum can cause pain. Whether ascending or descending, the stretching of the eardrum can cause pain. During this time, the eardrum is not able to vibrate, so you also experience decreased hearing and muffled sounds.  How to prevent ear pain when flying Everyone who has flown in an airplane has felt the effects of a change in altitude on ears; a feeling of fullness and popping is commonplace. You need to equalize the pressure by introducing as much air as possible via the Eustachian tube and there are several ways to do that.  Swallowing – When you swallow, that clicking or popping sound you may hear is a tiny bubble of air that has moved from the back of the nose into the middle ear, via the Eustachian tube. The Eustachian tube ensures that the air in the middle ear is constantly being replenished. That air is then absorbed into the membranes of the inner ear, and the cycle starts over again. This constant cycle of air ensures that the air pressure on both sides stays equal. When you fly, the trick is to ensure that the Eustachian tubes work overtime and open more frequently to accommodate the change in air pressure.  Chewing gum or sucking on hard candy – Chewing gum or sucking on hard candy will stimulate frequent swallowing which helps equalize air pressure.  Valsalva maneuver – With a mouthful of air, close your mouth and pinch your nostrils shut. Gently force air out until ears your ears pop. This opens the Eustacian tubes. If you are sick with a cold or allergies, the Valsalva maneuver is not recommended, as it could cause a severe ear infection. Instead, try a lesser known method called the Toynbee maneuver: Close your mouth and nose and swallow several times until pressure equalizes. Repeat either technique as needed. Other expert tips:  Know the many causes of clogged ears, which can include anxiety If you can stay awake during ascent and descent. Drink lots of fluids in-flight to stay hydrated. Yawn. Try EarPlanes, specially designed ear plugs that have a filter to equalize pressure. Use nasal…

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Flying and Your Child's Ears (for Parents) – Nemours KidsHealth

Flying and Your Child’s Ears (for Parents) How Does Flying Affect Ears? Many of us have felt that weird ear-popping sensation when we fly. For kids (especially babies and young children), it can feel especially odd and even be scary at first. But it’s a common, normal part of flying. This sometimes uncomfortable sensation is related to pressure changes in the air space behind the eardrum (the middle ear). Normally, the Eustachian tube, a passageway that leads from the middle ear to the back of the throat behind the nose, equalizes the air pressure in the middle ear to the outside air pressure by opening and letting air reach the middle ear. When our ears “pop” while yawning or swallowing, the Eustachian tubes are adjusting the air pressure in the middle ears. In kids, however, the relatively narrow Eustachian tubes might not do this as well, especially if they’re clogged with mucus from an ear infection or cold, or blocked by enlarged or swollen adenoids. Whether you’re flying, scuba diving, climbing a mountain, or even riding in an elevator, air pressure decreases as you go higher and increases as you go lower. If the pressure isn’t equalized, the higher air pressure pushes on one side of the eardrum and causes pain. That’s why so many babies cry during those last few minutes of the flight, as the air pressure in the cabin increases as the plane prepares to land. But the pain is only temporary — it won’t cause any lasting problems for kids and usually will ease within a few minutes as the Eustachian tubes open to let the air pressure equalize on both sides of the eardrums. If your child has an ear infection, your doctor may recommend delaying flying, if possible, until the infection is gone. This will help your child avoid increased pain and a possible rupture, or tear, of the eardrum. In kids who have had ear tube surgery, the tubes will help the air pressure equalize more easily. What Can Help Ease Ear Pain? These tips can help equalize the air pressure in your child’s ears and prevent or decrease ear pain during air travel. Have your child: Drink plenty of non-caffeinated fluids (water is best) throughout the flight. Drinking a lot is very important. It encourages swallowing, which opens the Eustachian tubes. Also, airplane air is dry, which thickens nasal mucus, making it more likely for the Eustachian tubes to become clogged. Take acetaminophen or ibuprofen about a half hour before takeoffs or landings if you know your child has ear pain when flying. Chew gum or suck on hard candy (only if your child is over 3 years old). Take a bottle or pacifier or breastfeed. If you bottle-feed, make sure your baby is sitting upright while drinking. Yawn frequently. Stay awake for takeoff and landing. During sleep, we don’t swallow as often, so it’s harder to keep the air pressure in the middle ear equalized. Practice a breathing exercise. Older kids and teens can practice this exercise during a flight’s ascent and descent: Breathe in slowly, then gently pinch the tip of the nose and exhale through the nose while closing the mouth. Repeat as necessary. If your child takes medicines that contain antihistamines or decongestants, talk to your doctor about whether to continue them during the flight. In some cases, a child may continue to have ear pain for longer periods (up to several hours) if the ears don’t “pop.” You can continue to give your child pain relievers according to the package directions until the pain eases. If it continues for more than several hours, call your doctor for advice. With a little patience and some simple precautions, though, you can make your next family flight less stressful and more comfortable for both you and your child.

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How to Relieve Ear Pressure on Your Next Flight

How to Relieve Ear Pressure on Your Next Flight We’ve all been there before. The plane begins to descend into Orlando International Airport – you’re home. As your flight comes to an end, a large amount of pressure is put on your body, and suddenly you feel intense ear pain and experience ear popping. This is known as airplane ear and it can become quite severe for many passengers. So what is it and what can you do to help prevent airplane ear pain? In normal conditions, air pressure on either side of the eardrum should be equal. Airplane ear is caused by unequal pressure that develops between the air in the middle ear and the air outside the ear. The space in the middle ear behind the eardrum is connected to the back of the nose by a tiny channel called the Eustachian tube. During a plane’s descent, the air pressure pushes the eardrum inward. Unless equal air pressure travels up the Eustachian tube, the result – airplane ear – can be painful. How Can I Prevent Ear Pain While Flying? To equalize the pressure in your ears, you need to allow more air to pass through the Eustachian tube. This can be done in several ways, including: Eating Something. Air is more likely to flow up the Eustachian tube if you swallow, yawn or chew. This is why a flight attendant will offer you a snack, like peanuts. Gum is also helpful. Breathe Using the Valsalva Maneuver. This involves taking a breath in and then gently letting the breath out with your mouth closed and while pinching your nose. This will push air into the Eustachian tube and you may hear a ‘pop’ as air enters the middle ear. This is effectively how you pop your ears. Stay Awake. If you are sleeping, you are unable to take precautions necessary to prevent these symptoms and may wake up to pain. Why Are Some People Affected, But Not Others? In some people, their Eustachian tube does not open as easily as others, preventing the flow of air. This may be the result of a narrow tube or a condition that causes the tube to become blocked. Blockage of the Eustachian tube is generally the result of mucus or inflammation caused by a cold, throat infection, or the flu. For people with these conditions, they should try these options to relieve air pressure when flying: Take an Antihistamine. This will reduce the amount of mucus you produce and limit blockage. Use a Decongestant Nasal Spray. This will dry up the mucus, also reducing the blockage of your Eustachian tube. Wear Pressure Regulating Ear Plugs. Because the air pressure changes quickly during the descent, the plugs will slow the amount of air that enters the ear and puts pressure on the eardrum. If ear pain or dulled hearing does not clear within a few days of your trip, be sure to Schedule an Appointment with a Specialist at The Ear, Nose, Throat, & Plastic Surgery Associates. MarketingInsights2020-08-11T10:46:58+00:00

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Airplane Ear: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment & Prevention

Airplane Ear: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment & Prevention Overview What is airplane ear? Airplane ear happens when your ears are affected by air pressure inside an airplane. Normally, air pressure inside and outside the ears is the same. However, when a plane takes off or starts its descent to land, the rapid change in altitude changes the air pressure inside the cabin. When this happens, you may notice an uncomfortable pressure or blockage in the ears. Others may hear a pop within the ears or feel temporary pain. Once the ears adjust upon landing, airplane ear goes away. In a small number of cases, the pain or blocked feeling may remain. If this happens, you should talk to a healthcare provider. How common is airplane ear? Airplane ear is quite common, but it affects everyone differently. Some may feel pain, while others complain of only slight discomfort (or have no pain at all). If you have a cold or an ear infection, the symptoms may be even more uncomfortable. Most people recover quickly from airplane ear once the plane has landed and air pressure has been equalized. Symptoms and Causes How does a person get airplane ear? The Eustachian tubes are slim tubes that connect the ear with the nose and throat. They open and shut every time you swallow or yawn to keep the air pressure even between the ears and the nose/throat. If air pressure changes too quickly for the Eustachian tube to react, then there may be too little or too much air behind the ear drum. You can feel this pressure difference. It can also interfere with sounds vibrating through the ear drum and the hearing bones. Every time a plane takes off (ascends) and lands (descends), the air pressure changes and the ears need to adapt. Until the Eustachian tubes equalize the pressure, the difference between the inside and outside pushes on the eardrum. This pressure difference causes it to hurt and not work properly. Sounds may also become muffled. The discomfort of airplane ear worsens when flying with a cold, nasal congestion or allergies. What are the symptoms of airplane ear? When an airplane is ascending or descending, the following symptoms can occur: Blocked ears. Discomfort or pain deep inside the ears. Muffled hearing. Symptoms are more common with descent (landing), but usually clear after the plane lands. Diagnosis and Tests How is airplane ear diagnosed? Airplane ear usually goes away once the plane lands. A formal medical diagnosis is usually unnecessary. However, call your doctor if you have any of the following symptoms: Ongoing pain. Persistent blocked hearing. Vertigo Ear drainage or bleeding. Your doctor will examine the ears, may order a hearing test (audiometry) or measurement of ear drum pressure (tympanometry). The doctor may then suggest options to alleviate the symptoms of blockage and pain. Management and Treatment What can be done to relieve symptoms of airplane ear? Suggestions to help ease the discomfort of airplane ear include: Stay awake during takeoff and landing. This will help the passenger be more aware of changes in the ears, and so better able to react. Swallow and yawn when ear…

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How to pop ears after a flight: Clogged ear remedy – CNN

How to pop ears and prevent ear pain on your next flight, according to experts Ear pain during and after flying — otherwise known as “airplane ear” — is generally considered to be a trivial part of travel. It’s a small price to pay while soaring through the air to your destination. But those who experience regular pain, pressure or clogging in their ears know that the discomfort can easily ruin an entire flight and can even result in pain and hearing loss for the first few days after touchdown. So what causes airplane ear, and how can you prevent it? Let’s take a look at what experts say is the cause and some remedies for how to pop your ears after a flight. Getty Images/iStockphoto You may notice that you experience pain or clogging after every flight while your travel partner is completely unfazed by the change in pressure. Research published in the AIMS Public Health journal suggests that those flying with a common cold, acute or chronic sinusitis, seasonal allergies, a middle ear infection or those who tend to nap on an airplane, especially during rapid pressure change, will be much more prone to ear pain than their fellow travelers. But what is the scientific reason that some ears clog? “Certain travelers will experience ear pain or clogging due to the pressure-relieving system in the inner ear, which balances pressure on the eardrum (eustachian tubes),” explains Dr. Bob Bacheler, DNP, CFRN, CCRN, flight physiology educator and managing director of Flying Angels, Inc. “The inner ear is much better at equalizing decreasing pressure (ascent) than it is at relieving decreasing pressure (descent). It’s the exact same reason why so many babies start to cry when a plane is landing.” Whether you regularly travel while experiencing seasonal allergies, you’re big into napping on a flight or you just have plain bad luck when it comes to ear pain, there are certain tips and tricks to help make that clogging and pressure a little more bearable. EarPlanes $17.95 at Amazon EarPlanes brand earplugs are a common sight among frequent flyers for preventing ear pain before it starts. The plugs relieve air pressure discomfort by slowing the shift in air pressure change as it reaches your ears. The more gradual change in pressure exerts less stress on the eardrum and minimizes overall discomfort. You must use them correctly, however. Before your flight takes off, you should relieve any existing pressure in your ears by holding your nose, closing your mouth and blowing out gently with your nose. After you have relieved pressure, lift your ear, insert the plug and twist until it fits comfortably. PUR Chewing Gum $10.49 at Amazon This is a classic technique for travelers: chewing gum. By chewing gum or swallowing, it can help to pop your ears when you’re in the air. It may not completely solve your ear pain problems, but it can help. “I recommend chewing gum in addition to other preventative measures,” says Phil Dengler, co-owner of The Vacationer. “I have found that on its own, chewing gum is not enough to fully prevent severe ear pain when flying.” YumEarth Organic Lollipops $9.04 at Amazon For those looking for a tasty and helpful tool…

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Airplane Ear: 5 Tricks To Pop It (that Work Like A Charm)

Airplane Ear: 5 Tricks To Pop It (that Work Like A Charm) | Doctors In Italy Airplane ear: 5 detailed tips to pop your ear (that work like a charm) Written on: January 14, 2020 You are about to land in Rome, at the end of a long flight, ready to enjoy the city tours and the local Dolce Vita. You are tired and sleepy and you suddenly notice that your ear feels clogged and muffled.  You wait for that familiar “pop” that won’t come.  The miracle of ear popping Have you ever wondered what part of your body is responsible for this process?  Now you know, it’s your Eustachian tube. The Eustachian tube connects the inside of the ear to the back of the throat and nose.  Its job is to regulate the air pressure from outside and inside the ear, preventing the eardrum from bulging in or out.  When it does its job it’s like magic: no ear pressure, no crackling sounds.  Why my ears won’t pop? When the Eustachian tube is not functioning properly and there is a sudden change in the air pressure, there can be severe ear pain and possibly hearing loss. Altitude and air pressure changes are just a trigger.  The causes of the problem generally stem from respiratory illnesses. Common cold with runny nose, sinusitis, may cause fluids and secretions to be blocked inside the Eustachian tube.  The tube becomes inflamed and sticky and soon air is trapped and cannot force its way out of the middle ear Ear infections often occur simultaneously and cause strong pain in the ear. Symptoms include: excessive ear pain and pressure, difficulty hearing, ringing within the ear or feeling dizzy. Tips to avoid airplane ear A preventive treatment is based on a balanced use of nose sprays, decongestants and oral antihistamines prior to flying.  These medications can be found at any pharmacy but there are other tricks to help you popping your ears after a flight.  Chewing gum or sucking on hard candies. Swallowing (e.g. sip water frequently).  Using special ear plugs, that can be bought at any airport, and have been designed to reduce the pressure changes during the flight Trying the Valsalva maneuver (positive pressure against a closed nose). This can equilibrate pressure in the middle ear to the outside and sometimes force air from the inside of the nose to the middle ear.  Steaming. Boil a pot of water and inhale the steam to help reduce the thickness of the secretions inside your ear.  When seeing a doctor is the right thing to do In some cases, medical treatment is required.  If you have already planned a flight and have severe pain even on the ground, you should schedule a visit with an ENT specialist to make sure you are not going to damage your eardrums.  If your condition does not allow you to fly safely, it’s always better to change traveling plans. The doctor can issue an “unfit to fly” certificate to use for insurance refund claim purposes.   The most important part is to be aware of your condition and assess in time the potential damage to the ear.  So next time you are flying over Rome, besides trying to spot the Coliseum, take a minute to listen to what your ears are trying to tell you with their pop! Still got doubts? DoctorsinItaly Team This article was written, curated, and updated by the DoctorsinItaly team, as part of our efforts to share relevant and current information on health and wellness related topics, as well as on life as an expat or traveler in Italy. April 25, 2020 No Comments February 15, 2020 No Comments January 14, 2020 No Comments January 14, 2020 No Comments

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How to Pop Your Ears on a Plane—And Why They Pop, Anyway

How to Pop Your Ears on a Plane—And Why They Pop, AnywayWe’ve all felt it: A plane descends, pressure inside the cabin changes, pressure builds inside our ears, and then—pop! Here’s everything you need to know about why altitude changes affect your ears and how to deal with it, pain-free.Why Do Your Ears Pop on Airplanes?It all starts with your Eustachian tube, a pencil-sized funnel connecting the back of your nose with the middle ear. As your airplane prepares for landing, it ensures air pressure on both sides of the eardrum stays roughly the same. “When you fly, they’re changing the pressure around you,” says Dr. Quinton S. Gopen of Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center. “To keep up, you need to open and close your Eustachian tube, or it will hurt your ear.”Why Your Ears Won’t PopOne common reason ears just won’t pop? Colds or allergies, which cause your mucus membranes to become inflamed. That inflammation then causes the Eustachian tube to become clogged and it’s unable to open and close properly. At best, this is gonna hurt. At its worst, you may rupture your eardrum or bleed into the space behind it.”The worse the cold is, the higher the risk that you end up with an ear problem,” says Dr. Alicia M. Quesnel, an otologist at Massachusetts Eye and Ear. Many doctors recommend not flying with a stuffy nose—most often, though, avoiding travel isn’t practical advice. Instead? Attempt to limit your flight time. If you must travel with a cold, consider a nonstop, rather than a connection.”It’s not the length of time you’re flying that matters,” Quesnel says. “It’s how many times you’re going up and down.How to Pop Your Ears1. Yawn or talk to open the mouth and activate the Eustachian tube.Yawning or even talking can work well for mild discomfort. Even a fake yawn, where you simply mimic the wide stretching of a the mouth, can do the trick.During any of these actions, “you’re opening and closing that tube,” Quesnel says. “When you open and close that tube you’re equalizing pressure with the outside world.”Repeat every few minutes until you feel your ears pop and there’s relief from the pressure.2. Chew gum, swallow liquid, or suck on candy to change the pressure in your throat.These approaches, recommended by moms everywhere with fussy babies, really do work. “Swallowing activates the muscles that open the Eustachian tube,” the American Academy of Otolaryngology says.3. Use a long-acting nasal decongestant.Use a long-acting nasal decongestant to offset any swelling that might be going on in your nose and interfering with your Eustachian tube. Doctors recommend 12-hour or 24-hour Sudafed, or Afrin nasal spray. If you’re using the nasal spray, give yourself a spray 30 minutes before takeoff, and again at 30 minutes from descent.”These medicines are not a cure-all, and you can still have problems,” Quesnel says, “but you can optimize your ability to equalize pressure by taking a nasal spray.”4. Try the Valsalva maneuver…Gently pinch your nose shut. While pinching, suck in your cheeks. Then, with your cheeks still sucked in, proceed to blow air out (with your nose still pinched shut). This technique will target any pressure that’s in the back of the nose specifically.5. …or the Toynbee maneuver.This ear-popping technique is simple but effective. Gently pinch your nose shut while simultaneously swallowing. You can try the Toynbee and the Valsalva maneuvers back to back until you feel relief.6. Avoid sleeping during takeoff or descent.If you pass out on the plane before it even takes off, or are still sleeping while it’s in descent, you won’t be swallowing, chewing, yawning, or doing any of the other things that will help your ears pop naturally—and that lack of release (and relief) may lead you…

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How to Stop Your Ears From Popping in an Airplane

How to Stop Your Ears From Popping in an Airplane Pressure inside the ear can build up during flights. (Photo: ear image by Connfetti from Fotolia.com ) During flights, passengers may experience popping, sometimes painful ear pressure, known by the medical term barotrauma. As a plane takes off and lands, rapid air pressure changes inside the cabin increase the pressure in the middle ear. The Eustachian tube, which connects the middle ear to the pharynx, equalizes pressure on both sides of the eardrum by allowing the release of air and drawing in air from the nasal passages. Fortunately, you can stop–and prevent–your ears from popping through relatively simple means. Step 1Yawn or swallow frequently during the flight. These activities relax the Eustachian tube and allow for air pressure to equalize inside and outside the ear. Chewing gum or sucking on hard candy can help your mouth produce saliva, which induces the swallowing process. Step 2Pinch your nose and blow gently with your mouth closed to reduce pressure inside the ear. According to SkynetMD, children and adults older than 8 years of age can open up the Eustachian tube by blowing softly into a balloon. Step 3Before the flight, take a decongestant, which will help clear the Eustachian tube, if you have a cold and are “stuffed up.” If you’re very congested, consider postponing your flight because discomfort or pain can be considerable. In addition, the rapid pressure changes could permanently damage your eardrums. Step 4Breastfeed your infant to prevent him from experiencing painful ear popping, says SkynetMD. You can also give him a pacifier or a bottle of milk. References Warnings If you continue to experience pain or discomfort after your flight, visit a doctor immediately. Writer Bio Angela Brown has been a book editor since 1997. She has written for various websites, as well as National Public Radio, Pacifica Radio and more than 20 fiction anthologies. Brown earned a Bachelor of Arts in theater and English from the University of Wisconsin.

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How to Pop Your Ears on an Airplane | Frommer's

How to Pop Your Ears on an Airplane | Frommer’sWhat to do when your ears get stopped up on a flight—and some tips for preventing the problem in the first place Why do your ears get clogged on an airplane? It has to do with the air pressure outside of your head not matching the air pressure inside your middle ear. In ordinary circumstances (like when you’re not hurtling through the sky in a metal can), air pressure is regulated by a narrow passageway called a eustachian tube that connects the middle ear to the back of your nose. The tiny membranous breezeway lets outside air into the empty chamber that is your middle ear so that your eardrum can vibrate properly.But when a plane is taking off and landing, the very fast changes in altitude cause very fast changes in air pressure and overworked eustachian tubes can go haywire, closing up and causing temporary discomfort, popping, and muffled hearing. This condition is known as barotrauma or, less imaginatively, airplane ear.How do you unclog your ears during a flight?According to the Rocky Mountain Ear Center of Colorado—a state where they should know a thing or two about dealing with changes in altitude—getting your stuffed-up ears to pop requires giving a workout to the muscles of the jaw and soft palate, which open the eustachian tubes. Frequent swallowing, forced yawns, and chewing gum (which causes you to swallow more and move your jaw a lot at the same time) are all good strategies. If those don’t work, it’s time to try the Valsalva maneuver.It’s a lot less dramatic than the name makes it sound. You simply take a breath, close your mouth, pinch both nostrils shut, and then press the air out (without puffing out your checks). Do this as the plane ascends and descends, when the pressure in your middle ear and the cabin are most out of whack. Variations on the Valsalva include the Toynbee maneuver, which sounds like the title of a lost John le Carré thriller but is actually just swallowing a sip of water while pinching your nose. In the educational clip below, a nurse from Singapore General Hospital demonstrates both maneuvers, along with another ear-popping solution that requires you to blow up a balloon using one nostril. (If you try this on an airplane, please send us the video.)Are there ways to prevent clogged ears on an airplane?Don’t sleep during takeoff or landing. You swallow less when you snooze and, besides, you need to stay awake if you’re going to complete the Valsalva maneuver or inflate that balloon with your right nostril (seriously, send us the video). If you already have nasal congestion going into the flight, the pressure on your eardrum is going to be a lot worse. The Mayo Clinic recommends using an over-the-counter nasal spray or taking a decongestant pill 30 minutes to an hour before takeoff; you can spritz the nasal spray again about half an hour before landing.Avoid overusing sprays, however, because they can eventually make congestion worse. Passengers who are pregnant or have certain heart conditions should avoid oral decongestants. Ear pain during a flight can verge on unbearable if you have…

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15 Hacks to Make Periods Suck Less



Starting your period can be a scary thought, but it’s a completely normal part of growing up, and is definitely not something to be afraid of. From products to buy to tips on using tampons, here’s our advice for beginners…

Read packaging

You should read the packaging carefully to try to find out what tampons and pads are made from before buying because most are made from synthetic materials that are made without care for the environment or your health.

Avoid synthetic materials

Try to avoid tampons made from materials like rayon and viscose which are man made (synthetic) and pads that use lots of plastic, and synthetic materials that claim to be “cotton-like” as they are largely made from synthetic materials that are almost impossible to get rid of in the environment.

Choose natural products

Organic cotton tampons and plastic and chemical-free pads are recommended by many gynaecologists in order to avoid the risk of allergic reaction caused by exposure to synthetic materials and chemicals. Try to choose natural products whenever possible.

Have a natural period!

All Natracare products are made using natural, sustainably sourced, biodegradable materials.

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Check your breasts

When your periods start for the first time, it is important to start checking your breasts each month so that you learn what is normal for you so that if something unusual is noticed you can get it checked out straight away by a doctor. Look at the diagrams and the instructions on how to examine the breasts and start the routine of checking your breasts after your period has finished each month.

Keep a diary

Keeping a menstrual diary helps you to work out when your next period should start. This will also help you to know when you need sanitary pads or tampons. Also, you will be able to know if your period is late or early and will have a record if you need to see your doctor about your periods.

Talk to friends

Girls are under so much pressure to be seen as caring, sharing, slim and beautiful, that it can be difficult to remember that you should just feel good about being yourself. This can seem difficult at times, especially as the changes that your body goes through can take less or more time than those of your friends. So remember that whatever you are feeling, there are many others who probably feel just the same way as you. You are not the only person going through a big change, so talk about how you are feeling to your family and friends.

Using tampons

Before inserting a tampon always give the cord a little tug to ensure it is secure inside the tampon. The cord hangs outside of the body to help you to remove the tampon when you need to change it. You should change the tampon at least every four hours. Make sure that you wash your hands before and after doing so. Always remember to remove the tampon before inserting a new one. At the end of a period when there will be only a very small amount of blood, it is better to use a pad rather than a tampon. Some practice is needed before you get used to putting in a tampon, but you should not use a tampon unless you are having a period. Using them when you do not have a period can cause dryness and irritation, and will absorb the protective mucous that your vagina produces to keep it clean.

A Word on Toxic Shock Syndrome (TSS)

Toxic Shock Syndrome (TSS) is potentially fatal illness which is linked with tampon use. Toxic Shock Syndrome (TSS) is a rare but fatal disease caused by a particular type of bacteria that can produce toxins in the body. The symptoms of TSS come on fast and are often severe. Menstrual TSS has been linked to the use of super-absorbent and synthetics in tampons1.

Independent research conducted by Dr. Tierno at New York University Medical School concluded that the bacterium causing TSS did not produce toxins in the presence of 100% cotton tampons.

Results of a study, published in The Journal of Infectious Diseases in Obstetrics and Gynaecology, suggest that the use of 100% cotton tampons may reduce the risk of Toxic Shock Syndrome compared with tampons that contain rayon.

The study was carried out on 20 tampon varieties, including Natracare 100% cotton tampons, and concluded that all-cotton tampons did not produce the dangerous TSS toxin from the bacteria Staphylococcus aureus, while other tampons did.

The paper states that, “The incidence of reported cases of Toxic Shock Syndrome has declined since the removal of high absorbency fibres from tampons, such as polyacrylate rayon, polyester and carboxymethyl-cellulose (CMC). However, the disease continues to occur in young menstruating women using the newer less absorbent tampons made of viscose rayon with and without cotton.”

The summary to the paper stated, “All-cotton tampons did not produce TSST-1. This is likely because cotton provides fewer factors to favour TSST-1 production compared with fibres previously removed from tampons (CMC, polyester, polyacrylate rayon)….“In sum, women who are without protective levels of antibody to TSST-1 and use non all-cotton tampons are at the greater risk of TSS.”

Natracare believes that women should be vigilant and become familiar with the symptoms of TSS. Read carefully the tampon instruction leaflets found in the packs before starting to use tampons.

The symptoms of TSS can occur suddenly, and at any time during menstruation. Be aware of these symptoms, which need not be present all at the same time.

  • Sudden high fever (102°F, 39°C or more)
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Diarrhoea
  • Headache
  • Sore throat
  • Dizziness
  • Fainting or near fainting
  • Rashes that look like sun-burn (skin peeling may occur days later)
  • Muscular pain
  • If you get any of these symptoms, you must remove your tampon and do not use any more.Seek immediate medical attention and be sure to inform your doctor that you are menstruating and using tampons and that you are concerned about TSS.1. P.M. Tierno Jnr, B.A. Hanna, Propensity of Tampons and Barrier Contraceptives to Amplify Staphylococcus Aureus Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxin. Journal of Infectious Diseases in Obstetrics and Gynaecology 2, 140-145 (1994).

Are you expecting your first period? Find everything you need to know about periods here.

FAQs

How can I make my period easier?

Here are eight tips and tricks that could make your time of the month a little easier, more manageable and even enjoyable.

  1. Eat dark chocolate. …
  2. Have an orgasm. …
  3. Track your cycle. …
  4. Avoid waxing. …
  5. Don’t overdo the caffeine. …
  6. Fight cramps with acupressure. …
  7. Don’t let stains last. …
  8. Organise yourself.

Feb 9, 2016

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What should we not do in periods?

While some women experience only mild symptoms, some may be afflicted with severe symptoms such as nausea and headaches, loose stool, and dizziness. Along with that, there are some women who experience no period pain at all. Dr Laha says, ?It is completely normal to not experience any kind of pain during periods.?

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What is painless period?

Dairy isn’t a smart choice.

Dairy is a major part of a well-balanced diet, but eating too much cheese or consuming too many milk-based products on your period can cause your period cramps to worsen. In fact, dairy can lead to bloating, gas, and diarrhea, according to Healthline. So, play it safe and skip the ice cream.

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Is milk good during period?

If menstrual blood gets into your mouth, just rinse thoroughly and spit out.” ?Felice Gersh, MD. According to a gynecologist, the main potential issue when it comes to ingesting period blood is bloodborne pathogens.

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Can you drink period blood?

Having a lot of dairy products is not the best idea, as it can cause cramping. Dairy products like milk, cheese, and ice cream contain arachidonic acid (an omega-6 fatty acid), which can increase inflammation and can intensify your period pain.

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Is ice cream good for period?

Combat painful periods

If you experience painful periods, also called dysmenorrhea, you know all too well how uncomfortable this time of the month can be. The good news is that exercises such as light walking may help you decrease these symptoms.

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Does walking help periods?

Dark chocolate may help ease menstrual cramps due to its high magnesium content. Magnesium helps relax muscles and may stop the production of compounds that signal cramps. Copper, another nutrient found in dark chocolate, may also play a role.

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Is chocolate good for periods?

The menstrual cycle does not directly impact weight loss or gain, but there may be some secondary connections. On the list of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) symptoms are changes in appetite and food cravings, and that can affect weight.

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8 period tricks to make your life easier – Good Housekeeping

8 period tricks to make your life easier Periods can cause pain, fatigue, bloating and irritability, but they don’t necessarily have to be that way. Here are eight tips and tricks that could make your time of the month a little easier, more manageable and even enjoyable. 1. Eat dark chocolate We certainly don’t need reminding that chocolate tastes even better when you’re on your period – but you need to make sure it’s 70% cacao to replace the nutrients that we naturally lose through bleeding. So this only applies to natural, dark chocolate and is not a free pass for a chocolate free-for-all… Apologies. 2. Have an orgasm Having an orgasm while on your period contracts the uterus and increases the blood flow, which can reduce period pain. The pleasure also gives your brain a hit of natural, pain-reducing chemicals. Try our guide to female masturbation to get you started. MORE: 8 reasons your period is irregular 3. Track your cycle Don’t let your period creep up on you and catch you unawares when you’re out and about and unprepared. There are lots of apps that can help you, or go old school with paper and a pen. 4. Avoid waxing Being on your period makes the whole vaginal area more sensitive, so waxing is likely to hurt a lot more. The same goes for epilating. 5. Don’t overdo the caffeine Linked to increasing levels of oestrogen, caffeine can make your PMS symptoms worse, so opt for green tea instead. Alcohol has the same affect as it lowers blood sugar. MORE: 7 ways you’re making your period worse 6. Fight cramps with acupressure Apparently, rubbing a small ‘O’ shape on the palm of your left hand just below the thumb knuckle can help ease cramps – perfect for a public place when you’re out of painkillers. 7. Don’t let stains last Use the Good Housekeeping Institute’s foolproof way to remove blood stains. 8. Organise yourself Put your sanitary products into a small bag or tin in your handbag so they don’t fall around inside your bag. MORE: 8 things doctors tell their friends about periods Like this? Subscribe to the Good Housekeeping newsletter.

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6 tips for trouble-free periods during summer – Healthshots

6 tips for trouble-free periods during summer Published on: 10 May 2022, 17:23 pm IST Summer brings its own set of problems along with rashes and excess sweat. These period tips can help you have a happy period. Here’s how to have a hassle-free period in summer. Image Courtesy: ShutterstockWant to have a safe period during summer? We have got some effective period tips. Summer can be discomforting when you have your menses. The scorching heat and sweat will mean that you will have to take extra care of your intimate hygiene and make sure that you stay healthy and happy. Let us tell you about some important tips that you need to follow during those sunny days when you are on your period. Here are some period tips for summer:1. Avoid wearing two pads at the same time:Those women having a heavy flow tend to wear 2 pads simultaneously. They think that doing so will help to prevent staining of clothes and control the flow. This, however, is a myth as it can invite an infection in the vaginal area. A better option for this is to stick to one pad and instead change the pad more often if the flow is more.2. Keep the vaginal area clean:Some women end up using intimate washes or other chemical-laden products down there. But, douching is a strict no-no. Remember that the vagina is a self-cleaning organ. Instead of using any harmful products, opt for lukewarm water to wash the area. In addition, remember to change your pads or tampons regularly after 4-6 hours to avoid infections. The first thing among period tips is maintaining vaginal hygiene! Image courtesy: Shutterstock3. Maintain overall hygiene:Along with menstrual hygiene, you need to also take care of your overall hygiene. Vaginal and urinary tract infections (UTIs) are commonly seen during summers. Even skin irritation, rash, redness, and itching due to sweat can steal one’s peace of mind. Try to take shower at least twice a day, Do not remain in sweaty clothes for a longer time. Wear cotton clothes that are skin-friendly. Avoid wearing tight clothes. 4. Carry sanitary pads and tampons while traveling:If you are out enjoying your vacation, be prepared for an unannounced period! Carry tampons and pads to change regularly which keeps you fresh and worry-free. When stepping out, carry your stash of tampons or sanitary pads. Image courtesy: Shutterstock5. Rest enough:Do not exert during periods. Take care of your body and use a hot compress to manage the cramping and abdominal pain.6. Exercise without fail:Do some light yoga, walking, or moderate cardio exercises. But, cut back on heavy weight-lifting exercises to avoid overexertion and tiredness during menses. Dr Pratima Thamke Dr Pratima Thamke is a Consultant Obstetrician and Gynaecologist at the Motherhood Hospital, Kharghar

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15 Hacks to Make Periods Suck Less – Cosmopolitan

15 Hacks to Make Periods Suck Less 1. Keep spare panties in a desk drawer at work or in a pouch in your backpack. Leaking blood onto your undies is an inevitability. It’s going to happen, you know it’s going to happen, so why not prepare and keep a few pairs of good panties (not bad ones you’ll dread having to use) in your backpack or desk for when the blood flood cometh? 2. Get a heating pad that doesn’t require an outlet. Not only does heat feel really nice and cozy, but it stimulates blood flow and lessens pain from cramps. Most heating pads need to be plugged in, but as long as you have access to a microwave in your office kitchen, a hot water bottle doesn’t need an outlet to relieve your cramps. There are cute options on Amazon, or you can go DIY, and make your own microwavable heating pad by filling a knee sock with rice and tying off the ends. If you’re truly desperate, your hot laptop is basically also a heating pad. Just don’t burn yourself. 3. Cut down on coffee. It seems counterintuitive to scale back the caffeine while you’re probably at your sleepiest, but your body will be so happy if you do. Caffeine can cause your body to retain more water, resulting in a nasty bloated feeling, and worsen cramps. Don’t make things harder than they already are. Just cut out a bit of your daily caffeine. 4. Plan your period snacks ahead of time to make sure you’re not going crazy with salt. Another thing that makes your body retain more water is salty foods, which you probably crave while you’re on your period and your body feels like it’s falling apart. Save yourself from the tempting pull of cravings by actually giving snack prepping a shot the week of your period. Some good things to include in those snacks are fatty nuts like almonds, oranges, bananas, and a lil bit of dark chocolate. 5. Use meat tenderizer to save the undies and jeans you thought you ruined. You may think you ruined your pants, but you did not actually ruin your pants. Verified clean person Jolie Kerr has a lot of great tips for getting bloodstains out of things (and almost all of them involve things you definitely already have at home). Meat tenderizer powder (not the spiky hammer thing) is cheap and especially good for getting out old, set-in bloodstains — like the ones you get when you have your period on your undies at work or school, and can’t immediately take them off and rinse them in a public sink. Kerr recommends sprinkling the stain with tenderizer, adding enough water that a paste forms, letting it sit and soak for 20 to 30 minutes, and then rinsing with cold water before washing. 6. Go for a light jog, or, like, at least take a good walk. I know. I know the last thing you want to do when your uterus feels like it’s trying to claw its way out of your body is go running. When you exercise, your body releases endorphins, a hormone that makes you feel good. Those endorphins can counteract the bad hormones that give you cramps (prostaglandins). To make running a bit easier so you’re not squatting on the sidewalk every half mile (something I have 100 percent done), try taking a single painkiller about half an hour before your run. 7. Up your iron levels by eating lots of spinach and kale. The reason you might find yourself salivating at the thought of a red, juicy steak when you’re on your period is because your iron levels could be a tad low. Instead of reaching for a greasy burger, which will only make you feel even more like garb, try other iron-rich foods like spinach and kale. 8. Use gauze and toilet paper to make a DIY pad. Because periods can’t actually be tracked and are unpredictable little jerks, there will be times in your life when you need to fashion your own…

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Period Advice for Beginners – Natracare

Period Advice for Beginners – Natracare Starting your period can be a scary thought, but it’s a completely normal part of growing up, and is definitely not something to be afraid of. From products to buy to tips on using tampons, here’s our advice for beginners… Read packaging You should read the packaging carefully to try to find out what tampons and pads are made from before buying because most are made from synthetic materials that are made without care for the environment or your health. Avoid synthetic materials Try to avoid tampons made from materials like rayon and viscose which are man made (synthetic) and pads that use lots of plastic, and synthetic materials that claim to be “cotton-like” as they are largely made from synthetic materials that are almost impossible to get rid of in the environment. Choose natural products Organic cotton tampons and plastic and chemical-free pads are recommended by many gynaecologists in order to avoid the risk of allergic reaction caused by exposure to synthetic materials and chemicals. Try to choose natural products whenever possible. Have a natural period! All Natracare products are made using natural, sustainably sourced, biodegradable materials. Find out more Check your breasts When your periods start for the first time, it is important to start checking your breasts each month so that you learn what is normal for you so that if something unusual is noticed you can get it checked out straight away by a doctor. Look at the diagrams and the instructions on how to examine the breasts and start the routine of checking your breasts after your period has finished each month. Keep a diary Keeping a menstrual diary helps you to work out when your next period should start. This will also help you to know when you need sanitary pads or tampons. Also, you will be able to know if your period is late or early and will have a record if you need to see your doctor about your periods. Talk to friends Girls are under so much pressure to be seen as caring, sharing, slim and beautiful, that it can be difficult to remember that you should just feel good about being yourself. This can seem difficult at times, especially as the changes that your body goes through can take less or more time than those of your friends. So remember that whatever you are feeling, there are many others who probably feel just the same way as you. You are not the only person going through a big change, so talk about how you are feeling to your family and friends. Using tampons Before inserting a tampon always give the cord a little tug to ensure it is secure inside the tampon. The cord hangs outside of the body to help you to remove the tampon when you need to change it. You should change the tampon at least every four hours. Make sure that you wash your hands before and after doing so. Always remember to remove the tampon before inserting a new one. At the end of a period when there will be only a very small amount of blood, it is better to use a pad rather than a tampon. Some practice is needed before you get used to putting in a tampon, but you should not use a tampon unless you are having a period. Using them when you do not have a period can cause dryness and irritation, and will absorb the protective mucous that your vagina produces to keep it clean. A Word on Toxic Shock Syndrome (TSS) Toxic Shock Syndrome (TSS) is potentially fatal illness which is linked with tampon use. Toxic Shock Syndrome (TSS) is a rare but fatal disease caused by a particular type of bacteria that can produce toxins in the body. The symptoms of TSS come on fast and are often severe. Menstrual TSS has been linked to the use of super-absorbent and synthetics in tampons1. Independent research conducted by Dr. Tierno at New…

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How to Get Regular Periods Naturally: 8 Home Remedies for …

How to Get Regular Periods Naturally: 8 Home Remedies for Irregular PeriodsThere are a variety of reasons why you may be experiencing menstrual irregularity. Excessively heavy or prolonged periods is called menorrhagia. Common symptoms include a period that lasts longer than 7 days or bleeding that’s so heavy you have to change your period product every hour. Causes of menorrhagia may include:Medications. Some anti-inflammatory or hormone medications can affect menstrual bleeding. Heavy bleeding is also a side effect of IUD birth control.Hormone changes. An excess of the hormones progestin or estrogen, which regulate the lining of the uterus, may cause heavy bleeding. Hormone imbalances occur most frequently in people who have recently started menstruating or those approaching menopause. Medical conditions. Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), endometriosis, inherited blood disorders, and benign growths and cancers have all been found to possibly cause menstrual irregularity. Looking to regulate your periods? There are many at-home remedies that can help. 1. Practice yogaYoga may be an effective treatment for different menstrual issues. A 2017 study with 64 women looked at the effect of practicing yoga over 12 weeks. It found improved physical function, less body pain, swelling, breast tenderness, and fewer cramps. An older 2013 study with 126 participants also found that 35 to 40 minutes of yoga, 5 days a week for 6 months lowered hormone levels related to irregular menstruation.Yoga has also been shown to reduce menstrual pain and emotional symptoms associated with menstruation, such as depression and anxiety, and improve quality of life in women with primary dysmenorrhea. Primary dysmenorrhea is a condition that causes extreme pain before and during menstrual periods.If you’re new to yoga, you can look for online yoga videos for beginner or level 1 yoga. This will teach you how to properly do several moves. YouTube is also full of free videos where licensed yoga teachers walk you through a full yoga practice, making it easy to keep up with a regular yoga practice in the comfort of your own home.2. Maintain a healthy weightChanges in your weight can affect your period. If you’re in a larger body, losing weight could help regulate your periods.Alternatively, extreme weight loss or being underweight can cause irregular menstruation. That’s why it’s important to maintain a moderate weight. People who menstruate and have obesity are also more likely to have irregular periods and experience heavier bleeding and pain. This is due to the impact that fat cells have on hormones and insulin.If you want to lose weight, talk with your doctor. They can help you identify a target weight and come up with a strategy of how to get there.3. Exercise regularlyExercise has many health benefits that can help your periods. It can help you reach or maintain a moderate weight and is commonly recommended as part of a treatment plan for polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). PCOS can cause menstrual irregularity.A 2021 clinical trial suggests that exercise can effectively treat primary dysmenorrhea by reducing the intensity and duration of pain associated with the menstrual cycle. However, more research is needed to understand the effect of exercise on an irregular cycle.4. Spice things up with gingerGinger is used as a home remedy for treating irregular periods, but there isn’t any scientific evidence to show that it works. However, ginger does seem to have other benefits related to menstruation, primarily related to relieving pain.A 2014 clinical study of 92 women with heavy menstrual bleeding showed that daily ginger supplements may help reduce the amount of blood lost during menstruation. Taking 750 to 2,000 mg of ginger powder during the first 3 or 4 days of your period has also been shown to…

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Getting your period at school: 5 tips for stress-free periods

Tips for how to have stress-free periods at schoolNo matter if you are still waiting for your first period or if you have been menstruating for a few years now, finding blood in your pants while at school is often inconvenient, especially if you (and your school) are not prepared for it. Here are five tips for how to deal with an unexpected period at school, or in any other public setting. One note: These instructions apply to schools in the US, Canada, and some European countries — access to menstrual products varies widely across the world. What’s your personal experience of getting your period at school? Let us know on Twitter or Instagram. 1. Know that it’s OK—this has happened to most people who menstruate. If you do get an unexpected period at school and are not prepared, there is no need to panic. You are not the first and definitely not the last in this situation. What’s important now is to make you feel comfortable with the situation. A big part of that is making sure your blood is collected in a way that makes you feel comfortable—that means getting some supplies. 2. Get supplies that you feel comfortable using. Schools usually stock their menstrual products in two places: the girls’ bathrooms (either in free-for-all baskets or in small change vending machines) and the nurse’s office. (Some schools may not have a nurse’s office or health office.) If you are in class, ask to be excused to the bathroom or the nurse’s office. Ask a friend who menstruates if they have an extra pad or tampon you could borrow. If they don’t, grab some small change just in case you need to use a vending machine to purchase supplies. If your teacher asks what’s happening and you don’t feel comfortable discussing your period in front of others (no need to feel bad about your body doing its thing, but it’s a subject that may take getting used to!), “stomach problems” are a good go-to. There are plenty of collection methods you can use. The two you are most likely to encounter are pads and tampons. Pads are the simplest to use and are most often available in school nurses’ offices—all you need to do is place one with the sticky side on your underwear and you’re good to go. Tampons are also frequently available. There is a bit of a learning curve involved with tampons, because they need to be inserted into your vagina. But many people prefer them, so if you feel comfortable, you can give them a shot. An increasingly popular method of managing your flow is the menstrual cup. It’s reusable and needs your attention even as rarely as every 12 hours, so it’s a favorite of many, but it might take a few tries to figure out just how to use it, as one of our colleagues can confirm. Regardless of which type of period product you decide to go with, a friend, the school nurse, or your parent will be able to demonstrate how to use it correctly. If you notice period stains on your clothing, pre-wash them with cold water and soap as soon as you can—either still in school or once you get home for the day. Blood is a hard substance to clean off many textiles after it dries, so quick action gives you better chances of getting the stain out completely in the washing machine later. However, if a garment remains stained, don’t worry about it too much. Many people have a few pairs of battle-worn “period panties.” These undergarments may be dotted with lighter spots from discharge or dark splatters of blood that just aren’t going away, but they are comfortable and a perfect choice for heavier flow days or days when you expect that your period may start. Once your pad, tampon, or other menstrual product is in place and you feel comfortable, you can continue with your day as normal. Check back every few hours to make sure you don’t need to change your product…

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Period Hacks: Use these Tips to Feel Better During Period – Sofy

Period Hacks: Use these Tips to Feel Better During Period | Sofy 0 Comments 672 Views December 28, 2021 A feeling of discomfort often goes hand in hand with the period. From bloating to cramps to emotional outbursts to PMS, every woman experiences these to some degree during their periods.  This can often be challenging and hinder your daily activities. We understand this and that is why we created some period hacks to help you feel better during that time of the month. Check out these tips:  Reducing Period PainIf you experience mild period cramps and pain, check out these period hacks:  Use a heating pad on your lower abdomen and lower backTake an Epsom salt bath with lavender and clary sage essential oilsMassage your abdomen with clary sage essential oil mixed with Jojoba oil.Do light stretches and exercises to relieve muscle cramps. 2. Alleviate BloatingPeriod bloating is a common symptom before or during the period adding to the discomfort. Here are some ways to relieve the bloating symptoms: Drink enough waterEat more fruits and vegetables. Make sure you are getting enough fiber, protein, vitamins, and minerals.Avoid drinking coffee. Drink herbal tea instead like chamomile tea, ginger tea, and peppermint tea. Get enough sleep 3. Overcoming Odour Vaginal odour is a normal thing before and after periods. However, if you smell a strong fishy or yeasty odor and you have itching, burning, or cheese-like discharge – you could have a yeast infection. In that case, you can check with your doctor and take over-the-counter medications for yeast infections. Say goodbye to period odour with Sofy Antibacteria Overnight sanitary napkin that prevents leakage and gives you 99.9% protection from bacteria that causes the smell.  4. Stay Healthy Often time-intense period pain or cramps can be due to an underlying health issue or nutritional deficiencies. Eat a healthy whole foods diet consisting of fresh fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, berries, grass-fed meat, eggs, fish, and whole grains. If you are deficient in iron or vitamins, you can take a supplement for the same. Keep the inflammation response of your body low by consuming enough Omega-3 fatty acids. Eliminate refined sugar, refined grains, refined hydrogenated oils, from your diet.  Incorporate these period hacks to help you reduce PMS, pain, cramps, and discomfort associated with the period.  

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All About Periods (for Teens) – Nemours KidsHealth

All About Periods (for Teens) A period is a release of blood from a girl’s uterus, out through her vagina. It is a sign that she is getting close to the end of puberty. There is a lot to learn about periods. Here are some common questions that teens have. When Do Most Girls Get Their Period? Most girls get their first period when they’re around 12. But getting it any time between age 10 and 15 is OK. Every girl’s body has its own schedule. There isn’t one right age for a girl to get her period. But there are some clues that it will start soon: Most of the time, a girl gets her period about 2 years after her breasts start to develop. Another sign is vaginal discharge fluid (sort of like mucus) that a girl might see or feel on her underwear. This discharge usually begins about 6 months to a year before a girl gets her first period. What Causes a Period? A period happens because of changes in in the body. Hormones are chemical messengers. The ovaries release the female hormones and . These hormones cause the lining of the uterus (or womb) to build up. The built-up lining is ready for a fertilized egg to attach to and start developing. If there is no fertilized egg, the lining breaks down and bleeds. Then the same process happens all over again. It usually takes about a month for the lining to build up, then break down. That is why most girls and women get their periods around once a month. How Does Ovulation Relate to Periods? Ovulation (pronounced: ov-yoo-LAY-shun) is the release of an egg from the ovaries. The same hormones that cause the uterus lining to build up also cause an egg to leave one of the ovaries. The egg travels through a thin tube called a fallopian tube to the uterus. If the egg is fertilized by a sperm cell, it attaches to the wall of the uterus, where over time it develops into a baby. If the egg is not fertilized, the uterus lining breaks down and bleeds, causing a period. Do Periods Happen Regularly When Menstruation Starts? For the first few years after a girl starts her period, it may not come regularly. This is normal at first. By about 2–3 years after her first period, a girl’s periods should be coming around once every 4–5 weeks. Can a Girl Get Pregnant as Soon as Her Period Starts? Yes, a girl can get pregnant as soon as her period starts. A girl can even get pregnant right before her very first period. This is because a girl’s hormones might already be active. The hormones may have led to and the building of the uterine wall. If a girl has sex, she can get pregnant, even though she has never had a period.How Long Do Periods Last? Periods usually last about 5 days. But a period can be shorter or last longer. How Often Does a Period Happen? Periods usually happen about once every 4–5 weeks. But some girls get their periods a little less or more often. Should I Use a Pad, Tampon, or Menstrual Cup? You have many choices about how to deal with period blood. You may need to experiment a bit to find which works best for you. Some girls use only one method and others switch between different methods. Most girls use pads when they first get their period. Pads are made of cotton and come in lots of different sizes and shapes. They have sticky strips that attach to the underwear. Many girls find tampons more…

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9 things to try when acne won’t clear



skincare dos donts

Posted on July 20, 2021

by Henry Ford Health Staff

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While acne is most commonly linked to the teenage years, the reality is, it can happen at any age.

“It’s not like you turn 20 and boom, your acne is gone,” says Anna Axelson, M.D., a dermatologist at Henry Ford Health. “In fact, acne happens for a variety of reasons, including genetics, lifestyle factors and fluctuating hormone levels.”

What Is Acne, Really?

Acne is the most common skin condition in the United States, affecting more than 50 million Americans each year, but most of us don’t really understand what it is.

The term “acne” applies to everything from run-of-the-mill whiteheads and blackheads (comedones) to deeper papules and painful cysts.

“Red, raised lesions occur when too much oil and dead skin cells clog pores, which triggers the body’s natural inflammatory response,” Dr. Axelson says. “Hormonal influences also play a big role, which is one reason women may notice acne around the time of their periods, during pregnancy and around the time of menopause.”

Do’s And Don’ts For Treating Acne-Prone Skin

You have to get ahead of acne to treat it effectively — and that starts with a skin care regimen designed to keep excess oil and bacteria at bay. Here are Dr. Axelson’s do’s and don’ts for treating acne-prone skin.

Do keep it clean

Wash your skin twice a day (no more, no less). You may want to choose a wash with active ingredients. Gentle cleansers without active ingredients are also helpful as well to decrease any irritation that may arise with acne treatments. To slough away dead skin cells, consider using an exfoliating cleanser once or twice each week.

Do look for active ingredients

The active ingredients you choose depend on which type of acne you have and your skin type. In general, doctors recommend cleansers and acne treatments that contain one of four active ingredients:

  • Benzoyl peroxide
  • Salicylic acid
  • Adapalene
  • Retinol

Each of these ingredients dries the skin and helps prevent acne formation. Dr. Axelson recommends a benzoyl peroxide cleanser in the morning and an adapalene or retinol product at night.

Do wear SPF

The best thing you can do for your skin — whether you have acne or not — is to wear oil-free, broad-spectrum sunscreen daily. Wearing sunscreen is especially important if you’re treating acne because ingredients like retinol, benzoyl peroxide and salicylic acid make your skin more sensitive to the sun. Sunscreen also helps decrease the redness or dark spots that may remain after acne has healed.

Do moisturize

It may seem counterintuitive to moisturize skin that’s already oily, but acne treatments are drying and it’s important to keep skin hydrated and support the skin’s natural barrier. Just be sure to choose a moisturizer that’s labeled noncomedogenic and oil-free, which means it won’t clog pores or lead to acne formation.

Don’t over-exfoliate

While it’s tempting to try to scrub acne away, over-exfoliating can strip the skin of natural oils, worsen irritation and make breakouts worse.

Don’t expect to see results immediately

You won’t see noticeable changes from a new product for at least six to eight weeks. Don’t give up too soon!

Don’t wear heavy makeup

Makeup can clog pores and lead to acne, especially if it’s oil-based and heavy. These products also make it difficult for your skin to breathe.

Don’t pop your pimples

Picking at your pimples or popping them not only makes a small pimple look much worse, but it can also extend healing time and increase the risk of scarring.

Taking Charge Of Acne

An effective skin care regimen can reduce acne symptoms and prevent breakouts from happening. But unfortunately, there’s no quick fix for acne. It can take up to three months before you’ll see noticeable changes in your skin from a new product. The trick is to commit to a daily anti-acne regimen, not just when you sense a breakout forming.

If you have hard-to-treat acne and over-the-counter products aren’t doing the trick, see a dermatologist. “It’s important to be proactive with acne treatment so you can prevent the type of acne that can lead to scarring,” Dr. Axelson says.

Work with your dermatologist to design a consistent regimen that your skin can tolerate, which may include in-office options such as peels, laser treatments, microneedling and prescription medications. A routine of dermatologist-approved treatments should put you on the path to clearer skin.

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To find a doctor or dermatologist at Henry Ford, visit henryford.com or call 1-800-436-7936.

Dr. Anna Axelson is a board-certified dermatologist who sees patients at Henry Ford Medical Centers in Detroit and Grosse Pointe Farms.

FAQs

How do you get rid of acne-prone skin?

Do’s And Don’ts For Treating Acne-Prone Skin

  1. Do keep it clean. Wash your skin twice a day (no more, no less). …
  2. Do look for active ingredients. …
  3. Do wear SPF. …
  4. Do moisturize. …
  5. Don’t over-exfoliate. …
  6. Don’t expect to see results immediately. …
  7. Don’t wear heavy makeup. …
  8. Don’t pop your pimples.

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What makes a skin acne-prone?

Four main factors cause acne: Excess oil (sebum) production. Hair follicles clogged by oil and dead skin cells. Bacteria

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Does ice help acne?

Benefits. While ice alone may not cure a pimple, it can decrease swelling and redness, making the pimple less noticeable. Ice also has a numbing effect, which can offer temporary pain relief for severely inflamed pimples.

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Does acne prone skin go away?

Will my acne ever go away? Most often, acne will go away on its own at the end of puberty, but some people still struggle with acne in adulthood. Almost all acne can be successfully treated, however. It’s a matter of finding the right treatment for you.

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Can drinking lots of water reduce acne?

Water has many ways in which it can improve your skin, which helps to improve your acne over time. Drinking water has both direct and indirect benefits for treating acne. Firstly, with bacterial acne, water helps to remove toxins and bacteria on the skin, reducing the potential for pore-clogging in the process.

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What age is acne the worst?

It usually develops at the age of 13 and tends to peak at age 17 although it can persist into the twenties. Girls develop acne at an earlier age than boys, usually between the ages of 13 and 17. Their acne will usually start to improve after the age of 17.

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At what age does acne stops?

Acne is most common in girls from the ages of 14 to 17, and in boys from the ages of 16 to 19. Most people have acne on and off for several years before their symptoms start to improve as they get older. Acne often disappears when a person is in their mid-20s. In some cases, acne can continue into adult life.

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Will I ever stop getting acne?

Many teens find that their acne improves as they get older and that it almost disappears by the time they reach their twenties. Others have acne well into their adult years. The good news is that acne can be treated ? and breakouts can sometimes be prevented. Prevention involves taking good care of the skin.

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Can lemon water clear acne?

Citric acid inside lemon water can help treat mild acne and brown spots. “Lemon juice contains citric acid which is helpful in treating mild acne and photoaging such as over tanned skin, wrinkles, and brown spots,” said board-certified dermatologist Dr.

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What age does acne clear?

Acne commonly starts during puberty between the ages of 10 and 13 and tends to be worse in people with oily skin. Teenage acne usually lasts for five to 10 years, normally going away during the early 20s. It occurs in both sexes, although teenage boys tend to have the most severe cases.

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9 things to try when acne won't clear

9 things to try when acne won’t clear Diseases & conditions Coronavirus Resource Center Acne Eczema Hair loss Psoriasis Rosacea Skin cancer A to Z diseases A to Z videos DIY acne treatment How dermatologists treat Skin care: Acne-prone skin Causes Is it really acne? Types & treatments Childhood eczema Adult eczema Insider secrets Types of hair loss Treatment for hair loss Causes of hair loss Hair care matters Insider secrets What is psoriasis Diagnosis & treatment Skin, hair & nail care Triggers Insider secrets What is rosacea Treatment Skin care & triggers Insider secrets Types and treatment Find skin cancer Prevent skin cancer Raise awareness Español Featured Monkeypox: What you need to know Monkeypox is a contagious disease that causes a rash. A board-certified dermatologist explains what the rash looks like and when to seek medical care. When to treat molluscum contagiosum This contagious skin disease will usually clear on its own, but sometimes dermatologists recommend treating it. Find out when. Everyday care Skin care basics Skin care secrets Injured skin Itchy skin Sun protection Hair & scalp care Nail care secrets Basic skin care Dry, oily skin Hair removal Tattoos and piercings Anti-aging skin care For your face For your skin routine Preventing skin problems Bites & stings Burns, cuts, & other wounds Itch relief Poison ivy, oak & sumac Rashes Shade, clothing, and sunscreen Sun damage and your skin Aprenda a proteger su piel del sol Your hair Your scalp Nail care basics Manicures & pedicures Featured Practice Safe Sun Everyone’s at risk for skin cancer. These dermatologists’ tips tell you how to protect your skin. Relieve uncontrollably itchy skin Find out what may be causing the itch and what can bring relief. Darker Skin Tones Skin care secrets Hair care Hair loss Diseases & Conditions Acne Dark spots Light spots Razor bumps Caring for Black hair Scalp psoriasis Weaves & extensions Central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia Frontal fibrosing alopecia Hairstyles that pull can cause hair loss Acanthosis nigricans Acne keloidalis nuchae Hidradenitis suppurativa Keloid scars Lupus and your skin Sarcoidosis and your skin Skin cancer Vitiligo Featured Fade dark spots Find out why dark spots appear and what can fade them. Untreatable razor bumps or acne? If you have what feels like razor bumps or acne on the back of your neck or scalp, you may have acne keloidalis nuchae. Find out what can help. Cosmetic treatments Your safety Age spots & dark marks Cellulite & fat removal Hair removal Scars & stretch marks Wrinkles Younger-looking skin Featured Laser hair removal You can expect permanent results in all but one area. Do you know which one? Scar treatment If you want to diminish a noticeable scar, know these 10 things before having laser treatment. Botox It can smooth out deep wrinkles and lines, but the results aren’t permanent. Here’s how long botox tends to last. Public health programs Skin cancer awareness Free skin cancer screenings Kids’ camp Good Skin Knowledge Shade Structure grants Skin Cancer, Take a Hike!™ Awareness campaigns Flyers & posters Get involved Lesson plans and activities Community grants Featured Free materials to help raise skin cancer awareness Use these professionally produced online infographics, posters, and videos to help others find and prevent skin cancer. Dermatologist-approved lesson plans, activities you can use Free to everyone, these materials teach young people about common skin conditions, which can prevent misunderstanding and bullying. Find a dermatologist Find a dermatologist What is a dermatologist? Why choose a board-certified dermatologist? FAAD: What it means How to…

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Acne-Prone Skin? How To Prevent Damage During Your …

Acne-Prone Skin? How To Prevent Damage During Your Skincare Routine Posted on July 20, 2021 by Henry Ford Health Staff 17260 While acne is most commonly linked to the teenage years, the reality is, it can happen at any age. “It’s not like you turn 20 and boom, your acne is gone,” says Anna Axelson, M.D., a dermatologist at Henry Ford Health. “In fact, acne happens for a variety of reasons, including genetics, lifestyle factors and fluctuating hormone levels.” What Is Acne, Really? Acne is the most common skin condition in the United States, affecting more than 50 million Americans each year, but most of us don’t really understand what it is. The term “acne” applies to everything from run-of-the-mill whiteheads and blackheads (comedones) to deeper papules and painful cysts. “Red, raised lesions occur when too much oil and dead skin cells clog pores, which triggers the body’s natural inflammatory response,” Dr. Axelson says. “Hormonal influences also play a big role, which is one reason women may notice acne around the time of their periods, during pregnancy and around the time of menopause.” Do’s And Don’ts For Treating Acne-Prone Skin You have to get ahead of acne to treat it effectively — and that starts with a skin care regimen designed to keep excess oil and bacteria at bay. Here are Dr. Axelson’s do’s and don’ts for treating acne-prone skin. Do keep it clean Wash your skin twice a day (no more, no less). You may want to choose a wash with active ingredients. Gentle cleansers without active ingredients are also helpful as well to decrease any irritation that may arise with acne treatments. To slough away dead skin cells, consider using an exfoliating cleanser once or twice each week. Do look for active ingredients The active ingredients you choose depend on which type of acne you have and your skin type. In general, doctors recommend cleansers and acne treatments that contain one of four active ingredients: Benzoyl peroxide Salicylic acid Adapalene Retinol Each of these ingredients dries the skin and helps prevent acne formation. Dr. Axelson recommends a benzoyl peroxide cleanser in the morning and an adapalene or retinol product at night. Do wear SPF The best thing you can do for your skin — whether you have acne or not — is to wear oil-free, broad-spectrum sunscreen daily. Wearing sunscreen is especially important if you’re treating acne because ingredients like retinol, benzoyl peroxide and salicylic acid make your skin more sensitive to the sun. Sunscreen also helps decrease the redness or dark spots that may remain after acne has healed. Do moisturize It may seem counterintuitive to moisturize skin that’s already oily, but acne treatments are drying and it’s important to keep skin hydrated and support the skin’s natural barrier. Just be sure to choose a moisturizer that’s labeled noncomedogenic and oil-free, which means it won’t clog pores or lead to acne formation. Don’t over-exfoliate While it’s tempting to try to scrub acne away, over-exfoliating can strip the skin of natural oils, worsen irritation and make breakouts worse. Don’t expect to see results immediately You won’t see noticeable changes from a new product for at least six to eight weeks. Don’t give up too soon! Don’t wear heavy makeup Makeup can clog pores and lead to acne, especially if it’s oil-based and heavy. These products also make it difficult for your skin to breathe. Don’t pop your pimples Picking at your pimples or popping them not only makes a small pimple look much worse, but it can also extend healing time and increase the risk of scarring. Taking Charge Of Acne An effective skin care regimen can…

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Acne-Prone Skin: What is it, Causes, What to Do, and Prevention

How to Care for Acne-Prone SkinCaring for acne-prone skin is about more than just applying blemish-busting products.It can involve lifestyle changes, too — the first of which is often a new and improved skin care routine.Read on for some expert tips on everything from picking and popping to effective clinical treatments.The simplest way to understand acne is to split it into two categories: noninflammatory and inflammatory types.NoninflammatoryNoninflammatory acne refers to clogged pores that appear as blackheads or whiteheads.It’s the mildest type and is easy to spot. Blackheads have a dark appearance and can appear somewhat flat against the skin. Whiteheads are small skin-colored bumps.InflammatoryAnything with a red or more robust appearance is essentially classified as inflammatory acne.This can range from papules and pustules to more severe nodules and cysts.Papules are small red bumps, while pustules are small bumps that contain pus. Papules often turn into pustules.Then there’s the deeper, more painful acne. These inflamed bumps are typically larger than your usual pimple and feel as if they’re underneath the skin. Acne vs. rosaceaSometimes acne is confused with rosacea. Rosacea is a chronic skin condition that often involves a tendency to blush easily and can often lead to chronic redness on the:cheeks nose forehead chin Although there are four subtypes of rosacea, the type most commonly confused with acne is papulopustular or acne rosacea. This type involves acne-like breakouts. On the other hand, acne vulgaris is a common type of acne characterized by inflammatory and noninflammatory lesions. It can involve pimples, blackheads, cysts, and other forms of acne. It’s possible to have both acne vulgaris and acne rosacea at the same time.Symptoms of acne rosacea can include:flushing and rednessvisible blood vesselsacne-like breakouts and red skinsensitive skinraised patches of skinAcne vulgaris involves clogged pores and may present as:pus-filled bumpsblackheadswhiteheadsoily skincysts and nodulesBesides the differences in symptoms, acne vulgaris is caused by clogged pores. The causes of acne rosacea are unclear, though it may involve a combination of hereditary and environmental factors.Possible causative factors for rosacea include:hereditary factorsan overreaction of the immune systema bacteria that causes intestinal infections called H. pyloria mite known as demodexthe way the body processes the protein cathelicidin, which normally protects the skin from infectionAcne is caused by a combination of hormones, oil, and bacteria. When oil, dead skin cells, and bacteria clog the follicles, sebum can’t escape the pores. This leads to acne.Each pore of your skin is also the opening to a hair follicle, which is made of a hair and sebaceous, or oil, gland. The oil gland releases sebum, which keeps your skin lubricated and soft.Causes of acne can include: your follicles producing too much oildead skin cells accumulating in your poresbacteria building up in your poresOverproduction of oil is usually because of hormonal changes, like:pubertythe menstrual cyclepregnancymenopauseThis is why hormonal birth control may help manage acne symptoms. Although many teenagers experience acne outbreaks, acne can happen at any age.Whatever the initial reason, acne occurs when pores become clogged and inflammation follows.It’s common to link oily skin to acne. After all, excess oil is a known contributor to breakouts.But dry skin types…

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9 Steps to improving acne-prone skin – Nuffield Health

9 Steps to improving acne-prone skin Acne can affect anyone at any stage in their lives. These top tips will help you improve the look of your skin without the use of any lotions or potions. Acne is not limited to affecting the face – many people suffer from painful, uncomfortable and unsightly spots on their backs, necks and chests too. In fact acne can affect people anywhere other than the palms of your hands and the soles of your feet. There are many myths about acne, including its origin. Acne is not caused by ‘being unclean’ or ‘eating greasy foods’.  It is caused by a genetic tendency to form both blocked pores and greasy skin. The blockage prevents sebum (naturally produced oils) from leaving the pores and this feeds and multiplies bacteria trapped in the follicle.  Your body reacts by sending white blood cells to fight the bacteria and this causes inflammation. For some, acne can be a relentless condition that needs medical treatment, for others changing lifestyle and nutrition may provide an antidote or help ease the condition. The following tips could help improve the look of your skin and boost your confidence in the process: 1. Lightly exfoliate regularlyRegular exfoliation will help to unblock pores and prevent new spots from occurring. Use a light, natural, nut-shell based body scrub once or twice a week and avoid harsh or chemical scrubs as they can aggravate spots. It’s important not to exfoliate too much as that can also aggravate your skin causing greater inflammation, and avoid using mitts or brushes as they build up bacteria that will make your skin worse.2. ExerciseDon’t give up on exercise. Many acne sufferers stop exercising because sweating seems to make it worse. Exercise will keep you healthy and can help unblock your pores by making you sweat. Just make sure you wash straight after exercise, preferably before the sweat has had time to dry. 3. Eat these foods Almonds, blueberries, avocados and kidney beans are among a range of foods which may help to reduce and prevent inflammation. This may make your skin less likely to develop the painful and inflamed spots that can make life miserable. 4. Enjoy the sun (but avoid sunbeds)Exposure to the sun is essential for people’s wellbeing as this is how we absorb vitamin D which helps strengthen our bones. And just 15 minutes of sun exposure a day could help treat the symptoms of acne by drying out the sebum. However, any longer and the drying effects could be counteractive, blocking the pores further with dry skin. It’s important to always wear sun protection with UVA and UVB protection when in the sun and avoid sunbeds at all costs as they emit huge levels of UV rays which are very damaging to your skin. 5. Don’t shower more than once a day Over washing can irritate the skin and cause more inflammation which can exacerbate acne.6. Drink lots of waterWater is essential for all of your bodily functions and this includes the liver which controls hormone production. Hormones play a part in acne by increasing sebum production, this is why acne often presents in teenagers who go through hormone spikes in those years. Drinking water will help keep you in optimal health. Drink two litres a day or more as appropriate if you are exercising.  7. Go make-up free, or use mineral-based make-upIf possible, wear no make-up as make-up may block your pores further. But if you feel the need to cover up marks and scars, use mineral-based foundation and concealer which doesn’t contain additional oils. The natural substance won’t aggravate your skin or cause additional inflammation and is less likely to clog your…

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The Complete Guide to Treating Acne-Prone Skin – Byrdie

The Complete Guide to Treating Acne-Prone Skin ohlamour studio / Stocksy When most people talk about acne-prone skin, a complexion covered in bright red bumps probably comes to mind, but there are several other ways acne can manifest. Although it’s the most common skin condition in the U.S., many people aren’t quite sure what acne really is, which can make treating and preventing breakouts feel frustrating, if not, impossible. The good news, however, is that with a consistent treatment plan, you can be on the path to clearer skin. We spoke with three dermatologists to learn what acne is, how it forms, and what you can do to manage it. Meet the Expert Dr. Marisa Garshick, MD, FAAD is a Board-certified dermatologist at MDCS: Medical Dermatology and Cosmetic Surgery Centers, and Clinical Assistant Professor of Dermatology, at Cornell University.Dr. Brendan Camp, MD, FAAD is a double board-certified dermatologist at MDCS Dermatology in Manhattan.Dr. Craig A. Kraffert, MD is a board certified dermatologist and founder of Amarte Skin Care and DermStore. 01 of 07 The Different Types of Acne ohlamour studio / Stocksy Although acne is technically the name of the skin condition that can result in breakouts, pimples of all types have become synonymous with the term. While acne symptoms do all start out the same way, some may progress to form different types of breakouts. “All acne lesions have the same starting point, the microcomedone, a microscopic blockage of the narrow duct extending around a fine hair follicle unit from the deeper dermis to the skin surface,” says Kraffert. “As the microcomedone persists, it can become a normal open comedone (blackhead) or a closed comedone which resembles a tiny whitehead at the skin surface. Inflamed comedones are sometimes raised with surrounding redness. Some microcomedones do not progress into typical comedones, but instead develop underlying inflammation. Depending on the degree of inflammation and its depth within the skin, these red and tender bumps are called papules and, when there are pus points centrally, pustules. Deeper painful papules are called cysts. Larger cysts are sometimes referred to as nodular cysts.” Comedones: “Generally, comedonal acne—which are considered whiteheads and blackheads—commonly show up in oily prone areas of the skin such as the T-zone, but can occur anywhere,” says Garshick. Papules and pustules: These are the “classic” symptoms you probably think of when you picture a pimple. “Red papules and pustules are considered more inflammatory acne, and as such, can also be attributed to bacteria and inflammation,” Garshick says. The main difference? papules are raised bumps, while pustules contain pus. Cysts: “Hormonal breakouts, while they can occur anywhere, tend to show up as deeper cystic breakouts [Ed. note: those “invisible” breakouts that feel tender to the touch.] involving the lower one-third of the face or the jawline area,” says Garshick. “For many people, these breakouts can be cyclical and occur around their menses.” 02 of 07 Acne Causes “The development of acne is multifactorial,” says Camp. “It involves follicular hyperkeratinization (exfoliating or shedding skin cells form a plug within a pore,) hormonal influences (androgens or sex hormones that signal sebum or oil production,) and inflammation related to bacteria.” To put it simply, acne symptoms, like…

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12 Tips to Combat Acne | Rush System

12 Tips to Combat Acne Embarrassing blemishes can hit everyone — from eighth graders to engineers.  While acne is not a serious health threat, it is significant in an emotional and social sense. If you have acne, often you have less self-confidence, and this can affect your social life or even your productivity at work. Learning how to stop breakouts before they happen is the key to keeping acne under control. Why do I get acne? Acne is an inflammatory skin problem caused by one or more of three things: Plugging of hair follicles Hormonal fluctuations that cause the body to secret excess oil Bacterial infection that causes inflammation Acne severity can range from blackheads and whiteheads to cysts. Nearly 85 percent of people between the ages of 12 and 24 experience acne. Why some people have severe breakouts while others barely have a pimple is not entirely clear. But genetics and environmental influences clearly play a role. How to get clearer skin All treatment for acne is aimed at preventing inflammation and reducing breakouts before they happen. Claudia Hernandez, MD, a dermatologist at Rush University Medical Center, offers these 12 tips to help you achieve clearer skin — and banish blemishes when they do appear: 1. Keep your face clean. Wash your face once or twice a day with an over-the-counter benzoyl peroxide face wash. This reduces inflammation and kills bacteria associated with acne formation. And make sure to remove all makeup and dirt so it doesn’t build up and clog your pores.  A very rare side effect of benzoyl peroxide is allergic contact dermatitis, so stop using the face wash if you develop a new rash. 2. Don’t scrub with a washcloth … Use your hands to clean your face, and pat your skin dry with a clean towel instead of rubbing it dry. Scrubbing can actually promote more acne. 3. … and avoid exfoliating brushes. While commercials tout the benefits of these brushes, avoid them if you have acne. Studies suggest they can actually worsen acne. That’s because the exfoliation causes more inflammation, resulting in more acne bumps. All treatment for acne is aimed at preventing inflammation and reducing breakouts before they happen. 4. Eat a healthy diet. While there is no scientific proof that chocolate and greasy foods aggravate acne, a study published in the Journal of American Academy of Dermatology suggests that consuming less sugars and carbohydrates results in decreased breakouts. Keep a food diary to determine if a specific food triggers your breakouts. Eating an overall healthy diet is always good advice, and it may also help your skin stay clearer. 5. Don’t ignore your hair. If you have oily hair, you may need to wash it more often than people who have dry hair. Keeping your hair clean — and off of your face — will help prevent breakouts on the forehead and face. Some hair products, including pomades and gels, may worsen acne. So if you have acne on your forehead and tend to use a lot of hair product, consider avoiding it. Headbands that cover your forehead can encourage acne, too, by keeping sweat in place.  6. Shower and wash your face right after working out.  Sweat sticks to your face and may contain acne-causing bacteria.  For back and chest acne, try using your benzoyl peroxide wash in the shower. Just remember — peroxide can bleach your linens, so stick with white towels and washcloths, and be sure you are totally dry before getting dressed.  7. Use moisturizers and sunscreens specifically made for the face. Lotions designed for the body are heavier and can clog your pores. Look for products with glycerine and hyaluronic acid, which hold moisture in the skin, and products labeled “non-comedogenic” — which means they don’t cause…

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How to Prevent Acne & Pimples: 10 Tips to Avoid Breakouts

10 Tips for Preventing Acne1. Keep your face clean. Whether or not you have acne, it’s important to wash your face twice daily to remove impurities, dead skin cells, and extra oil from your skin’s surface. Washing more often than twice daily is not necessarily better; it may do more harm than good. Use warm, not hot, water and a mild facial cleanser. Using a harsh soap (like deodorant body soap) can hurt already inflamed skin and cause more irritation.Avoid scrubbing your skin harshly with a washcloth, an exfoliating glove, or loofah (a coarse-textured sponge). Gently wash it with a very soft cloth or your hands. Always rinse well, and then dry your face with a clean towel. (Toss the towel in the laundry hamper, as dirty towels spread bacteria.) Also, use the washcloth only once.2. Moisturize. Many acne products contain ingredients that dry the skin, so always use a moisturizer that minimizes dryness and skin peeling. Look for “noncomedogenic” on the label, which means it should not cause acne. There are moisturizers made for oily, dry, or combination skin. 3. Try an over-the-counter acne product. These acne products don’t need a prescription. Most of them have ingredients such as benzoyl peroxide, salicylic acid, glycolic acid, or lactic acid, which curb bacteria and dry your skin. They may cause drying or peeling so start with a small amount at first. Then you can adjust how much you use and how often. Another option is a new OTC topical retinoid gel (Differin 0.1% gel). It works to actually keep the acne from forming. Use these products with caution if you have sensitive skin.4. Use makeup sparingly. During a breakout, avoid wearing foundation, powder, or blush. If you do wear makeup, wash it off at the end of the day. If possible, choose oil-free cosmetics without added dyes and chemicals. Choose makeup that is labeled as “noncomedogenic,” meaning it should not cause acne. Read the ingredients list on the product label before buying.5. Watch what you put on your hair. Avoid using fragrances, oils, pomades, or gels on your hair. If they get on your face, they can block your skin’s pores and irritate your skin. Use a gentle shampoo and conditioner. Oily hair can add to the oil on your face, so wash your hair often, especially if you’re breaking out. Got long hair? Keep it pulled away from your face. 6. Keep your hands off your face. Avoid touching your face or propping your cheek or chin on your hands. Not only can you spread bacteria, you can also irritate the already inflamed facial skin. Never pick or pop pimples with your fingers, as it can lead to infection and scarring.7. Stay out of the sun. The sun’s ultraviolet rays can increase inflammation and redness, and can cause post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation (dark discoloration). Some acne medications may make your skin more sensitive to sunlight. Limit your time in the sun, especially between the hours of 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., and wear protective clothing, such as a long-sleeved shirt, pants, and a broad-brimmed hat. Whether you have pimples or not, always apply a broad-spectrum sunscreen with 6% zinc oxide or higher and SPF 30 or higher at least 20 minutes before sun exposure. Look for “noncomedogenic” on the sunscreen label to make new pimples less likely. Read the ingredients on the product label to know what you’re putting on your skin. 8. Feed your skin. Most experts agree that certain foods, like chocolate, don’t cause pimples. Still, it makes sense to avoid greasy food and junk food and add more fresh fruits, vegetables and whole grains to…

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Acne – self-care: MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia

Acne – self-care: MedlinePlus Medical EncyclopediaAcne is a skin condition that causes pimples or “zits.” Whiteheads (closed comedones), blackheads (open comedones), red, inflamed papules, and nodules or cysts may develop. These most often occur on the face, neck, upper trunk and upper arm.Acne occurs when tiny pores on the surface of the skin become clogged. The pores can become plugged by substances on the surface of the skin. More commonly they develop from a mixture of the natural oils of the skin and the dead cells shed from the inside of the pore. These plugs are called comedones. Acne is most common in teenagers. But anyone can get acne.Acne breakouts can be triggered by:Hormonal changesUse of oily skin or hair care productsCertain medicinesSweatHumidityPossibly diet To keep your pores from clogging and your skin from becoming too oily:Clean your skin gently with a mild, non-drying soap.It may help to use a wash with salicylic acid or benzoyl if your skin is oily and prone to acne. Remove all dirt or make up.Wash once or twice a day, and also after exercising. Avoid scrubbing or repeated skin washing.Shampoo your hair daily, if it is oily.Comb or pull your hair back to keep the hair out of your face.Avoid using rubbing alcohol or toners that are very drying to the skin.Avoid oil-based cosmetics. Acne medicines can cause skin drying or peeling. Use a moisturizer or skin cream that is water-based or “noncomedogenic” or that clearly states that is safe to use on the face and will not cause acne. Remember that products that say they are noncomedogenic might still cause acne in you personally. Therefore, avoid any product that you find makes your acne worse.A small amount of sun exposure may improve acne slightly. However, too much exposure to sun or in tanning booths increases the risk for skin cancer. Some acne medicines can make your skin more sensitive to the sun. Use sunscreen and hats regularly if you are taking these medicines.There is no consistent evidence that you need to avoid chocolate, milk, high-fat foods, or sweetened foods. However, it is a good idea to avoid any of foods if you find eating those specific foods seems to make your acne worse.To further prevent acne:Do not aggressively squeeze, scratch, pick, or rub pimples. This can lead to skin infections as well as scarring and delayed healing.Avoid wearing tight headbands, baseball caps, and other hats.Avoid touching your face.Avoid greasy cosmetics or creams.Do not leave make up on overnight. If daily skin care does not clear up blemishes, try over-the-counter acne medicines that you apply to your skin.These products may contain benzoyl peroxide, sulfur, adapalene, resorcinol, or salicylic acid.They work by killing bacteria, drying up skin oils, or causing the top layer of your skin to peel.They may cause redness or peeling of the skin.If these acne medicines cause your skin to become irritated:Try using smaller amounts. A drop the size of a pea will cover the entire face.Use the medicines only every other or third day until your skin gets used to them.Wait 10 to 15 minutes after washing your face before applying these medicines.If pimples are still a problem after you’ve tried over-the-counter medicines, your health care provider may suggest:Antibiotics in the form of pills or creams that you put on your skinPrescription gels or creams containing a retinoid to help clear up the pimplesHormone pills for women whose acne is made worse by hormonal changesIsotretinoin pills for severe acneA light based procedure called photodynamic therapyChemical skin peeling Call your provider or a dermatologist if:Self-care steps and over-the-counter medicine do not help after several months.Your acne is very bad (for example, you have a lot of redness around the pimples, or you have cysts).Your acne is getting worse.You develop scars as your acne clears up.Acne is causing emotional stress. Acne vulgaris – self-care; Cystic acne – self-care; Pimples – self-care; Zits – self-careDraelos ZD. Cosmetics and cosmeceuticals. In: Bolognia JL, Schaffer JV, Cerroni L, eds. Dermatology. 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2018:chap 153.James WD, Elston DM, Treat JR, Rosenbach MA, Neuhaus…

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How to Get Rid of Acne: 29 Best Skin Care Tips … – Teen Vogue

How to Get Rid of Acne: 29 Best Skin Care Tips From DermatologistsWith some acne-treating products, though, you’ll need to go a level above a strong SPF. “If you are using a retinol or retinol-derivative treatment, or any ingredients that make your skin more sensitive, avoid sun exposure,” Dr. Dendy Engelman, MD, FACMS, FAAD, said.EltaMD UV Daily Sunscreen7. Skip Makeup When You’re Working OutTake an extra five minutes before hopping on the treadmill to completely wash your face and remove your makeup to minimize the risk of breakouts. “Sweat is released through visible pores in the skin,” says dermatologist Dr. Janelle Vega. “When makeup covers those pores, that barrier doesn’t allow the sweat to make it to the surface of the skin, which can lead to clogged pores. The trapped debris and bacteria are a perfect breeding ground for acne bumps and zits.”8. Wash Your Face Post-Workout“After sweating, immediately use an exfoliating cleanser to help keep your pores clear and remove excess oil,” says Dr. Zein Obagi of ZO Skin Health. Try keeping Neutrogena Rapid Clear Treatment Pads in your gym bag or locker for those times you need an on-the-go cleanse. These will remove any leftover dirt while treating your skin with acne-fighting salicylic acid.If you have body acne, taking a shower as soon as possible after working out is also key. It turns out that standing around in tight, sweaty workout clothes puts you at the greatest risk for bacne and rashes. “The whole idea is that the bacteria that live on the skin can get trapped in the hair follicles and cause inflammation,” says dermatologist Dr. Elizabeth Hale. “The more you work out in the heat the more likely this is.” Dr. Levin agrees that showering right after a workout is your best defense against body acne. But in a pinch, body wipes like the Yuni Shower Sheets will do the trick.Neutrogena Rapid Clear Maximum Strength Acne Face Pads9. Tailor Your DietSad but true: Any foods that cause a spike in insulin can lead to inflammation and an acne flare up, explains Dr. Kally Papantoniou with Advanced Dermatology PC.”Leafy green vegetables and other brightly-colored fruit and vegetables which are rich in antioxidants and nutrients dampen inflammation and improve skin quality (studies have shown acne patients have higher oil production and lower antioxidant levels),” says Dr. Weiser. “Limit intake of dairy products, which can contain hormones and antibiotics that can worsen acne breakouts.” Other skin-boosting superfoods include eggs, nuts, legumes, and quinoa.10. Drink Plenty of WaterOkay, so drinking your eight glasses isn’t going to magically clear your skin, but Dr. Levin does point out that “drinking water improves your overall health.” Plus, it won’t contribute to your acne struggles like the sugar and caffeine found in sodas and coffee.Hydroflask 16-Ounce Wide Mouth Cap Bottle11. Have a Cup of TeaTry sipping spearmint tea. According to Dr. Carl Thornfeldt, dermatologist and founder of Epionce Skincare, having two cups a day could reduce acne by 25 percent! Dr. Levin explains this is because spearmint tea has been shown to be anti-inflammatory and to reduce testosterone levels in some limited studies. “While it’s unclear how it works, and it’s important to note that there are no standardized studies, it is encouraging data that spearmint may have potential as a natural adjunct treatment for hormonal…

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WHAT ARE SOME TIPS FOR HANGING DRYWALL? – Rosie On The House



Call it wallboard, plasterboard, Sheetrock, or just plain “rock,” like some pros do, drywall revolutionized the way walls and ceilings are covered. Before the 1950s, when these paper-wrapped gypsum panels came into widespread use, it took days for lathers and plasterers to create a firm, flat foundation for paint or wallpaper. With drywall, it takes a fraction of the time. Two pros can typically cover a 12-by-16-foot room in about an hour.

To work that fast takes practice and a few specialized tools. But hanging drywall is not just about speed. Doing the job right means using screws of the correct length, off-setting panels so seams don’t line up, and making sure wires and pipes aren’t vulnerable to puncture.

Installing drywall is easy enough for a homeowner, as long as there’s someone to help; the heavy sheets are difficult to lift, particularly when doing ceilings. Follow the drywalling tips below to learn how to hang drywall like a pro.

Hanging Drywall Diagram

Hanging Drywall Diagram Of Parts

Illustration by Gregory Nemec

Despite their drab, if-you’ve-seen-one-you’ve-seen-them-all appearance, these flat sandwiches of gypsum plaster and recycled newsprint come in a variety of types and sizes to suit the specific demands of a job.

There are 1⁄4-inch-thick flexible panels to cover a curved wall or ceiling and 5⁄8-inch-thick abuse-resistant panels that are less likely to develop holes or dents. “Greenboard” keeps its integrity in the face of high humidity, making it a good choice for bathrooms. “Type X” resists fire, making it well-suited to furnace rooms and between-floor chases.

Massachusetts contractor Paul Landry often installs “blueboard,” so-called because of its indigo paper. It bonds tenaciously with veneer plaster, a finish much in demand in Landry’s area. The light-gray product known as drywall is the type in widest use.

When butted end-to-end, its factory-beveled lengthwise edges form a shallow swale for a topping of joint compound and tape. Half-inch is the preferred thickness for walls and ceilings; 5⁄8-inch works best if studs or joists are 24 inches apart, where thinner drywall would sag. The sheets most commonly available in hardware stores measure 4 by 8 feet, but lengths can reach up to 16 feet and widths up to 54 inches, which speeds the installation and minimizes the number of seams.

Bigger panels have their downside, however: They’re heavy and unwieldy. A 12-foot sheet of ½-inch drywall weighs about 80 pounds, nearly 30 pounds more than a standard 8-foot panel. That’s why manufacturers have developed 3⁄8-inch thick gypsum panels that weighs 16 percent less than standard sheets. These, however, are used only to cover existing drywall.

PLANNING AHEAD

  • To estimate the number of 4-by-8-foot sheets needed, calculate the total square footage of walls and ceilings and divide by 32. Buy one or two extra per room to cover any cutting mistakes.
  • Check that electrical cables are protected from screws or nails. Tuck wires behind receptacles as far as possible into the back of switch boxes and ceiling-fixture boxes. Uncover any electrical boxes concealed by insulation. Wires or plumbing pipes closer than 3⁄4 inches to the edge of a stud require a metal shield called a nail plate.
  • Plan ceiling-panel layout so seams are at least 8 inches away from light-fixture boxes. (Ceiling fixtures highlight imperfect seams.)
  • Stockpile sheets of drywall on edge in an adjacent room.
  • Whenever possible, place cut edges against corners, where they will be covered by trim or another piece of drywall.

Steps on How to Hang Drywall

1. Measure and cut drywall for the ceiling

Man Measures Ceiling For Drywall

Photo by David Carmack

  • To determine where the first panel’s end will land, measure out from a corner, perpendicular to the strapping, or the joists.
  • If the panel doesn’t span the entire ceiling, its end must land on the center of a strapping piece or joist. If it doesn’t, measure to the center of the farthest support piece the panel will overlap. Transfer that measurement to the edge of the first panel and mark it.
  • Hook a T-square on the panel and place it alongside the mark. Score through the paper on the front with a utility knife, using the T-square as a guide. Stand the panel on edge and snap the waste part of it away from the score line. Cut through the paper backing to remove the waste.
  • To help locate where screws will go around the room, mark the top plate at all locations where strapping or joists intersect the wall.

2. Cover the ceiling

Man Covers Ceiling For Drywall

Photo by David Carmack

  • With an assistant, hoist the first panel into one corner of the ceiling. The edges should be perpendicular to strapping or joists and one end should be tight to the wall.
  • As the assistant holds the panel, drive five screws, evenly spaced, in a line across the panel’s width and into the joist or strapping closest to the middle of the panel.
  • Use the marks on the top plate to help align the screws. Keep screws at least ½ inch from all edges. Drive the screwheads slightly below the surface of the paper but not so deeply that they break through.
  • Repeat this five-screw line at each joist or piece of strapping.
  • Continue the row in same fashion until reaching the opposite wall. Start the next row making sure all end joints offset the panels in the first row by at least 4 feet.

Tip: Add a screw next to any screw head that breaks the paper.

3. Using rotary cut-out tool

Man Uses Rotary Cut Out Tool For Drywall

Photo by David Carmack

  • Before installing a sheet of drywall over the electrical box of a ceiling fixture, measure from the center of the box to the near end of the last panel installed. Mark that panel end where the tape measure meets it and record the distance.
  • Cover the box with another panel, and attach it as in Step 3; do not drive screws any closer to the box than 24 inches.
  • From the mark on the last installed panel, measure out onto the new panel the same number of inches recorded previously, and mark the spot with an X.
  • Plunge the bit of a rotary cut-out tool into the center of the X. Move the tool outward until the bit strikes the inside of the junction box, then withdraw it and plunge it back into the panel next to the outside of the box. Hold the bit against the box and move the tool counterclockwise around its perimeter. Once the cutout is finished, drive the remaining screws into the panel.

4. Cover the wall

Men Cover The Wall With Drywall

Photo by David Carmack

  • Mark all the stud locations on the adjoining ceiling panels.
  • Use a tape measure to ensure the first panel’s end will land in the center of a stud; if it won’t, cut the panel as in Step 2.
  • With a helper, hold the panel against the studs so that one edge butts against the ceiling panel and one end fits snugly against the abutting wall.
  • Following the stud marks on the ceiling, drive a line of five screws through the drywall and into each stud. As in Step 3, start screwing into a stud close to the middle of the panel and work outward.
  • Continue hanging panels along the top of the wall, right over any window and door openings. (The excess will be trimmed later.) Make sure no seams line up with a door or window corner. Don’t fasten panels to the framing around the openings yet.

5. Trim around doors and windows

Man Cuts Out Drywall Around Window

Photo by David Carmack

  • Install the next row of panels as in Step 4, butting the edges tightly together. (On the bottom row, use a drywall lifter to pry the panel ½ inch up from the floor to allow for shrinkage of the framing.) As on the ceiling, offset the end joints from those in the previous row by at least 4 feet.
  • Hang panels right over the bottoms of the window openings, making sure the seams don’t line up with the corners. Don’t screw panels to the framing around the openings yet.
  • Cut out the switch and outlet boxes following the same procedure as with the ceiling boxes in Step 3: Mark the box locations before covering them with drywall, taking care not to drive any screws closer to each box than 24 inches. Cut holes for the boxes with a rotary cut-off tool, then drive any remaining screws.
  • With a cut-out tool or drywall saw, trim any ends and edges that project into window or doorway openings flush with the face of the innermost studs. Then screw the panel to the framing.

6. Make inside and outside corners

Man Hammers Nail In Corners Of Drywall

Photo by David Carmack

  • At inside corners, simply butt the end of one panel against the face of the panel on the adjoining wall.
  • For outside corners, install the first panel so its end is flush with the studs on the adjoining wall. Overlap this exposed end with the panel on the adjoining wall, so that the corner is completely encased in drywall. (With blueboard, the panel ends do not overlap at outside corners; their ends land flush with the corner of the stud. This void will be filled later with plaster.)
  • Cover outside corners with a metal corner bead, cut to the height of the wall. Trim each end to a 45-degree point and place the bead’s legs over the adjoining panel. Fasten the bead with 1 ½-inch drywall nails, hammered every 10 inches through the perforations in each leg so that the legs are tight to the wall and the corner is not distorted in any way. Do the same on the adjoining wall.

7. How to keep studs in line

Stud Alignment In Drywall Illustration

Illustration by Gregory Nemec

  • Drywall contractor Paul Landry assumes that carpenters frame walls so they are flat and straight. But he knows from experience that in the six to eight weeks between the time the framers finish and the drywallers start, studs can move, twist, and bow. Drywall will camouflage small misalignments, but studs that bow in or out more than a ½ inch will create an unsightly hump or hollow in the wall surface. That’s why, before he starts his work, Landry always looks for errant studs, using a long straightedge (such as the factory edge of a drywall scrap), held horizontally against the midpoint of the framing.
  • If he locates a wayward stud on an interior wall, Landry quickly brings it back into line with a saw and a shingle. First, he places his saw blade on the concave edge of the stud at the midpoint of the bow and makes a cut two-thirds of the way through the stud. A push on the stud’s opposite edge easily brings it into line with its neighbors.
  • To hold the stud in its corrected position, Landry inserts the shingle into the open kerf to act as a shim. Then he takes a couple of scrap pieces of 3⁄4-inch strapping that are long enough to extend about 1 foot above and 1 foot below the cut and screws one to each side of the stud.
  • On exterior walls, it’s unusual to find a stud that bows into the room, because the sheathing holds it in place. When Landry does, his only choice is to power-plane the edge of the stud back into alignment.

8. Finishing touches

Finished Drywall

Photo by David Carmack

  • After all the drywall has been installed, check for protruding screw heads. If you find any, carefully drive them in slightly below the surface of the drywall panel.
  • Also look for screws that were driven too deep and ripped into the paper face. Add a second screw next to any screw that has broken through the paper.
  • Sweep the floor clean, remove any debris and the room is now ready for drywall finishing.

Tools

FAQs

What should you not do when hanging drywall?

5 common drywall installation mistakes and how to avoid them

  1. Driving screws too deep. …
  2. Joints are too tight. …
  3. Fastening before trimming. …
  4. Placing joints next to doors and windows. …
  5. Having too many joints. …
  6. Kick off your next project at Al’s.

Oct 9, 2019

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Where do you start when hanging drywall?

Hang Drywall

  1. Starting with the top row, apply adhesive to the studs. …
  2. Holding the first sheet horizontally across the ceiling and close to the corner, align both vertical sides with studs. …
  3. Measure the remaining space, adding 1/4 inch for easier installation. …
  4. Tack the second piece into place with ring drywall nails.

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Is it better to hang drywall vertical or horizontal?

On commercial jobs, fire codes often require seams to fall on the entire length of the framing, so the drywall must be hung vertically. However, on residential jobs, the drywall on the walls is typically hung horizontally. For walls 9 feet high or shorter, hanging the drywall horizontally has a number of benefits

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When hanging drywall do you hang the ceiling first?

Hanging Drywall From the Top Down Hang drywall on the ceiling first, then the walls. Check the ceiling for bowed joists using a 4-ft. level. Irregularities less than 1/8 in

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Do you need to stagger drywall seams?

It’s not necessary to stagger seams on ceiling drywall. However, because these joints are relatively difficult to finish ? and tend to be noticeable in the finished product ? it’s a good idea to stagger the drywall panels to make the joints less visible.

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Should drywall go all the way to the floor?

It might sound counter intuitive at first to leave space between your floor and your wall, but you should always leave a ½ inch to ? inch gap between drywall and the floor.

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How many screws go into a 4×8 sheet of drywall?

Use about 32 drywall screws per sheet of 4-foot by 8-foot drywall installed horizontally on a wall. This total is comprised of four screws on the five middle studs and six screws on each of the two sides.

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Do you stagger drywall?

Drywall seams should be staggered to make walls stronger and seams less visible since they are often difficult to finish and can be noticeable in the end result. You can stagger seams by placing half the panel on the first row and a full-length panel on the second row and use mud or tape to create a mound over.

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Why do you drywall the ceiling first?

The primary reason that you want to start with the ceiling pieces first in installing drywall is for additional support. When you attach the ceiling sheets first, you can reinforce them with the wall pieces which will serve as a source of stability.

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Should there be a gap between drywall sheets?

Cut it to leave about a 1/8-in. gap at edges (right). In fact, when you’re hanging the ceiling, keep in mind that 1/2 in. along the perimeter will be covered by drywall on the walls.

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Should drywall touch the ceiling?

The ceiling should always be installed first in areas with a drywall ceiling. The wall sheets at the ceiling angles butt up flush against each other due to this method of hanging them before the walls. This primarily tightens and simplifies the junction points at the tops of ceilings.

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How far apart should drywall screws be spaced?

Field: About 16 inches apart

Both the International Residential Code (IRC) and USG, the manufacturer of Sheetrock, note that the recommended maximum field screw spacing for wall drywall is 16 inches. Some builders like to space fasteners tighter than that, so they go down to 12 inches.

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Should drywall end on stud?

Drywall Is Not on a Stud

All edges of all sheets of drywall must land on a solid surface such as a stud. A hanging drywall edge may work in the short-term, but in the long-term it can result in cracks and other serious wall issues.

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How to Hang Drywall Like a Pro (DIY) | Family Handyman

How to Hang Drywall Like a Pro Get that sheetrock up fast Introduction Installing drywall is not rocket science, but it will go faster and look better if you learn the fundamentals before you start (instead of after you’re done). Tools Required Materials Required 1-1/4-in. drywall screws1-5/8-in. drywall screws2 x 2 (for optional crutch)DrywallDrywall nails Drywall is one of the easiest-to-use and cheapest construction materials in the world. Even a serious mistake will make you chuckle, knowing you’ve wasted little time and probably less than five bucks. And the money you save handling the task yourself will come in handy when furnishing that new room. Hanging “rock” (short for “sheetrock”) doesn’t require a lot of finesse, but it is heavy work. But if you are in reasonably good physical condition, don’t be afraid to tackle one, two or even three rooms on your own. It’s sometimes hard to interest a pro in hanging just a room or two, or even get on the schedule. Besides, defining and covering the walls with a finished material can be satisfying. This how to install drywall article will demonstrate the basics of hanging drywall. If you do a good job of hanging drywall, the drywall can be taped and finished smoothly and easily. “Taping” refers to the process of filling fastener holes, applying joint tape and three layers of taping compound to seams and corners, and then sanding. (Read more about drywall taping here.) Poor drywall hanging techniques make it difficult for even a seasoned taper to deliver a flat, uncracked surface that’s free of nail pops and ready for paint. We’ll show you the techniques and tools the pros use to get the drywall job done fast and in a way that makes taping as painless as possible. Video: How to Tape and Mud Drywall Project step-by-step (15) Step 1 Fasten Backers at Corners Fasten wood backing wherever drywall ends have no support within 4 inches. Note: Make sure to check corners and ceiling/wall joints. Step 2 Measure Carefully Measure from the end of the ceiling to the middle of a joist and cut the sheet to length. Pro tip: End cuts should split framing members. Gaps at ends and splices should be less than 1/4 inch. Mark fastening guidelines every 16 inches from the end of the sheet with a drywall square. Cut overall lengths 1/4 inch shorter for easier fitting. Selecting Drywall Most drywalling calls for three basic types and thicknesses of material: Half-inch for framing spans of 16 inches or less. Five-eighths-inch for spans up to 24 inches on ceilings. The 5/8-inch drywall is also called Type X or fire-resistant. It is used in areas where a firewall is required, such as between a house and an attached garage. Consult your local building official for installation specifics. Half-inch drywall that’s water-resistant for humid areas such as baths (humid, not wet). This material is not acceptable for ceilings or areas such as tiled shower enclosures. Mold-resistant drywall is also sold for areas like basements where mold might be a concern. Door and window jambs and electrical outlets are usually set up for 1/2-inch drywall, so check to confirm. Three-eighths-inch and 1/4-inch are available as well but are rarely used except on curved wall surfaces or areas where thinner rock is required. For example, if you’re patching old plaster walls, 3/8-inch may be the only thickness that will match the depth of the plaster. Drywall usually comes in either 4×8 or 4×12 sizes. If you live in an area large enough to support a commercial supplier, it’ll offer more variety than…

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How to Hang Drywall in 8 Steps – This Old House

How to Hang Drywall Call it wallboard, plasterboard, Sheetrock, or just plain “rock,” like some pros do, drywall revolutionized the way walls and ceilings are covered. Before the 1950s, when these paper-wrapped gypsum panels came into widespread use, it took days for lathers and plasterers to create a firm, flat foundation for paint or wallpaper. With drywall, it takes a fraction of the time. Two pros can typically cover a 12-by-16-foot room in about an hour. To work that fast takes practice and a few specialized tools. But hanging drywall is not just about speed. Doing the job right means using screws of the correct length, off-setting panels so seams don’t line up, and making sure wires and pipes aren’t vulnerable to puncture. Installing drywall is easy enough for a homeowner, as long as there’s someone to help; the heavy sheets are difficult to lift, particularly when doing ceilings. Follow the drywalling tips below to learn how to hang drywall like a pro. Hanging Drywall Diagram Illustration by Gregory Nemec Despite their drab, if-you’ve-seen-one-you’ve-seen-them-all appearance, these flat sandwiches of gypsum plaster and recycled newsprint come in a variety of types and sizes to suit the specific demands of a job. There are 1⁄4-inch-thick flexible panels to cover a curved wall or ceiling and 5⁄8-inch-thick abuse-resistant panels that are less likely to develop holes or dents. “Greenboard” keeps its integrity in the face of high humidity, making it a good choice for bathrooms. “Type X” resists fire, making it well-suited to furnace rooms and between-floor chases. Massachusetts contractor Paul Landry often installs “blueboard,” so-called because of its indigo paper. It bonds tenaciously with veneer plaster, a finish much in demand in Landry’s area. The light-gray product known as drywall is the type in widest use. When butted end-to-end, its factory-beveled lengthwise edges form a shallow swale for a topping of joint compound and tape. Half-inch is the preferred thickness for walls and ceilings; 5⁄8-inch works best if studs or joists are 24 inches apart, where thinner drywall would sag. The sheets most commonly available in hardware stores measure 4 by 8 feet, but lengths can reach up to 16 feet and widths up to 54 inches, which speeds the installation and minimizes the number of seams. Bigger panels have their downside, however: They’re heavy and unwieldy. A 12-foot sheet of ½-inch drywall weighs about 80 pounds, nearly 30 pounds more than a standard 8-foot panel. That’s why manufacturers have developed 3⁄8-inch thick gypsum panels that weighs 16 percent less than standard sheets. These, however, are used only to cover existing drywall. PLANNING AHEAD To estimate the number of 4-by-8-foot sheets needed, calculate the total square footage of walls and ceilings and divide by 32. Buy one or two extra per room to cover any cutting mistakes. Check that electrical cables are protected from screws or nails. Tuck wires behind receptacles as far as possible into the back of switch boxes and ceiling-fixture boxes. Uncover any electrical boxes concealed by insulation. Wires or plumbing pipes closer than 3⁄4 inches to the edge of a stud require a metal shield called a nail plate. Plan ceiling-panel layout so seams are at least 8 inches away from light-fixture boxes. (Ceiling fixtures highlight imperfect seams.) Stockpile sheets of drywall on edge in an adjacent room. Whenever possible, place cut edges against corners, where they will be covered by trim or another piece of drywall. Steps on How to Hang Drywall 1. Measure and cut drywall for the ceiling Photo by David Carmack To determine where the first panel’s end will land, measure out from a corner, perpendicular to the strapping, or the joists. If the panel doesn’t span the entire ceiling, its end must land on the center…

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How to Hang Drywall – The Spruce

How to Hang Drywall Hanging drywall is a crucial skill that you keep returning to over and over when you remodel a house. With a small financial investment, you can substantially alter the look of unfinished spaces in little time. Garages, basements, attics, and other rooms are transformed by hanging this simple, low-cost slab of paper-faced compressed gypsum: drywall. Successful drywall installation hinges on correctly anchoring the drywall panels to the framing members. Once you master the technique of hanging drywall, you can inexpensively finish rooms. Hanging Drywall The term hanging drywall is sometimes used to refer to the entire process of installing drywall. Technically, hanging drywall is only the part of the process where drywall sheets are fastened to the walls and ceiling—all the work prior to applying joint compound and sanding. After hanging the panels, you will need to finish the joints. This includes traditional dry-sanding with sandpaper or a sanding screen or wet-sanding with a sponge to reduce the large amounts of dust that drywall compound creates when sanded. Hanging drywall the right way is critical for reducing the amount of drywall compound that you apply to the walls. Drywall that’s hung well needs very little drywall compound. Choose a Drywall Fastener: Screws or Nails Drywall is attached to framing either with drywall screws or nails. Though drywall screws have become the fastener of choice for most drywall installations, do-it-yourselfers without access to drywall screw guns may like the speed and convenience of nailing up drywall. Drywall Screws Drywall screws have a fluted head designed to recess slightly below the surface of the drywall paper without breaking it. Choose coarse thread screws for the best hold through the gypsum core of the drywall and into the wood behind. Use fine thread screws for metal studs. For do-it-yourselfers, the best tool for attaching drywall is a cordless drill with an adjustable clutch. Or use special drywall screw bits that fit into a drill chuck. These bits are designed to stop turning when the screw hits the desired depth. Drywall Nails Since many professional drywall installers use drywall screw guns, fewer installers use a hammer and nails to nail up drywall. That’s because the chief advantage of nailing up drywall is that it’s fast. If you have a lot of drywall to hang and don’t own or wish to rent a drywall screw gun, nailing is a good, low-cost alternative. Hammering drywall nails can actually be a more forgiving technique than driving drywall screws. Drywall screws tend to rapidly penetrate the drywall paper and tear through instantly. But with hammering, the broad, smooth head of the hammer allows for several hammer blows before the paper tears. While you can use the same process on the ceiling and on walls, it’s easier to nail drywall on walls than on the ceiling. Materials Drywall sheets Drywall fasteners (screws or ring-shank nails) Shims Wood glue or hot glue Check Wall Studs Before you start hanging the drywall, check the studs and joists for bows or twists. The finished walls will look best if the studs are as flat as possible. Visually inspect the studs or joists to see if they are aligned in a straight plane. To confirm alignment, hold a long, straight board or level across the framing. If any framing members stick out, trim them with a saw or a power planer…

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WHAT ARE SOME TIPS FOR HANGING DRYWALL?

WHAT ARE SOME TIPS FOR HANGING DRYWALL? – Rosie On The House TIPS FOR HANGING DRYWALL Hang Ceiling Drywall First When hanging drywall, always hang the ceiling first. This is the hardest drywall to hang, so get a partner and go slow. Large cracks due to misaligned sheets are hard to repair because the extra mud required to fill them will constantly fall out and drop to the floor (or worse, down the back of your neck!). Hang The Walls Next When hanging the drywall on the walls, always hang the top sheet first. Raise a sheet tight to the ceiling and secure it with a drywall nail at the top and bottom at each stud. Complete the top row throughout the room before proceeding to the bottom. Measurements When hanging the bottom sheet, cut the drywall to fit around electrical j-boxes and plumbing rough-ins. Measuring from left to right, determine (to the nearest 1/8 inch) the horizontal measurements on the wall to the box location. Pulling from left to right, mark the exact location on the top edge of the drywall. Using a four-foot drywall square and a pencil, transfer these marks to the face of the drywall. For your vertical dimensions, do not measure up from the floor. Instead, measure down from the bottom of the drywall that you have already hung. Transfer this measurement, measuring from the top down. You should now have a layout of the material to remove using a drywall keyhole saw, cut the drywall on your lay-out marks to accommodate the junction box. Before laying the drywall against your wall, mark on the sub-floor the locations of each stud. This will make the nailing or screwing of the drywall much easier. Set your bottom sheet along the wall and lift it to fit snugly against the bottom edge of the top piece of drywall that you have already hung. For this lifting process, a wallboard kicker is extremely helpful. Now that the sheet is tight and fits your junction box, use drywall nails to attach the drywall at the top and bottom of each stud.

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How to Hang Drywall | The Home Depot

How To Hang Drywall: 15 Tips For DIY Installation

How To Hang Drywall: 15 Tips For DIY Installation The Best Tips for How To Hang Drywall… If you’re working on a home renovation project and looking to save a little money with some DIY and sweat equity, then learning how to hang drywall is a great idea! It’s not very technically challenging. And you don’t need to have a degree in construction to give this project a go. What you need is strong arms (or the right tools), and a few good drywall installation tips.  PinDIY drywall hanging process*This post contains affiliate links. Please read our full disclosure policy HERE.* Here’s what will be discussed in this post: Luckily, I’ve got time to talk drywall while I’m waiting for paint to dry here in our ongoing basement renovation project. And I’ll tell you, I’ve gone through 800 paint swatches in the basement, guys. I love picking out paint. It’s literally one of my favorite things to do (If you need advice on the paint front, you’ve come to the right place, because we talk A LOT about paint here)! That said, picking out paint for a space that has little to no natural light presents unique challenges, that’s for sure.  But the paint is beside the point. Because today, we’re talking about how to hang sheetrock. Pin Hanging drywall is a great way to save money during a big renovation project. Basement renovation is a BIG project, and with a BIG project typically come BIG budget-busting, marriage-testing, hormone-challenging, sanity-testing issues. And that’s a lot of BIG issues to contend with. So here are a couple ideas/posts that may be useful: How to safely involve your kids in your next DIY projectHow to DIY together without filing for divorceOK, now that we’ve covered keeping the family unit intact as we plow through a big renovation, let’s talk hanging drywall. Pin Hanging versus finishing drywall: It may sound like a scary proposition to you if you have no experience with this task. But, if you are comfortable with a screw gun, you can tackle hanging drywall. Hanging sheetrock is the first step in the drywalling process. Hanging the drywall simply means buying it, carting it home, cutting it to fit a section of wall, then screwing it to the framing of the room you’re working on. Pin Finishing drywall follows hanging, and involves several steps. Mudding/taping/sanding/finishing the drywall is a separate issue. That’s what is done AFTER the drywall is hung, and before it’s ready for paint. A discussion of finishing drywall is for another time and post, and quite possibly a task you’ll want a professional to take off your plate. Because if you aren’t skilled at this part of the job, then you could definitely end up with a finished space that you won’t be truly happy with. Pin The finishing side of drywall jobs takes practice. And in my experience, lots of it. I was taught as a teen how to mud and tape, but even after years of practice, I’m still slow and my finished results are never perfect.  A professional drywall finisher will fly through finishing your drywall with incredible speed. Plus, they’ll do the clean-up. And sanding drywall is literally one of the ABSOLUTE messiest home projects there is. It ranks right up there with sanding/finishing floors (which is why I didn’t even sand our floors when we painted them). But just doing the hanging yourself? Especially hanging the sheetrock on the walls? That could save a good amount from your bottom line, and it’s really not an overly challenging task. Pin Here’s a video from YouTube that highlights the overall process and gives some great tips and advice for the process of hanging drywall. hanging drywall video instructions: supplies for hanging drywall: How To Hang Drywall – the best tips & tricks: 1.) Buy sheetrock in the smaller, 4×8 1/2″ lightweight variety. Do yourself and your back a favor. 4×12 sheets are available, but they are SUPER heavy and are much harder…

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How to Install Drywall (Top Tips for DIYers) – Bob Vila

Top Tips for Installing DrywallWalls & CeilingsFollow these tips to avoid cracks, unevenness, and other undesirable outcomes, so you can install drywall like pro!By Bob Vila | Updated Dec 29, 2021 11:33 AM

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